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Archive for the ‘PETTY CRIMES’ Category

MASTER THIEF’S FIRST JOB-APPRENTICESHIP OFF TO A BAD START

WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW

http://www.maniacworld.com/this-thief-is-an-idiot.html

IS DALLAS A PETTY CRIMINALS PARADISE?

As far as I can tell, police departments employ two main strategies when they’re under pressure to cut crime fast. In strategy no. 1, they flood crime zones with special police units that muscle criminals and contraband off the streets. In strategy no. 2, they simply downgrade crimes, or make it more difficult for citizens to report them.

E-Z-University

The Dallas police department chose the latter strategy last year when it announced that police officers would no longer respond in person to shoplifting incidents involving items worth $50 or less. Instead, victimized merchants were instructed to print a form off the DPD website, fill it out, and put it in the mail. According to the Dallas Morning News, the new process has been a huge hassle for merchants. “Retailers overwhelmingly described a time-consuming process with onerous paperwork requirements,” reported Tanya Eiserer and Steve Thompson.

As a result, more and more small thefts are simply going unreported. “Minor shoplifting offenses averaged about 10 a day before the policy,” write Eiserer and Thompson. “Immediately afterward, that fell to fewer than three a day.” The paper estimates that there’s been a 75 percent drop in petty shoplifing reports over the past year. Hooray, crime is tumbling!
Monsieur Patrick Clairvoyance Services

Dallas Police Chief David Brown told the Morning News that this strategy wasn’t a matter of trickery. Rather, it was about resource prioritization—“not responding to Class C shoplifting calls freed up the equivalent of nine officers,” he explained. (There are more than 3,400 officers on the force.)

I don’t have a big problem with this. Police departments have to make tough choices, and this is an example of a choice that’s entirely defensible given the realities of the municipal budget.

That being said, the Dallas police should not be allowed to claim the resulting statistics as some huge crime-fighting victory. The Morning News reports that the decision to ignore petty shoplifting accounts for one-third of Dallas’ 11 percent drop in total reported crime over the last year. This just goes to show that you need to be really, really careful when you’re talking about crime statistics, and what they mean. (The Morning News has done a consistently good job contextualizing these statistics.)

It also further validates my belief that, when it comes to police departments, qualitative assessments are more valuable than quantitative ones. A huge drop in crime doesn’t necessarily mean that the police are being any more effective; it could just mean crimes are being downgraded or ignored. As this Dallas situation shows, “less crime getting reported” is not the same thing as “less crime.”
OCD Customs

ANCHORMAN ON CRUISESHIP ANSWERS CHARGES IN COURT


OBLIVIOT OF THE WEEK #896: "I guess he thought it was a big joke," said
  attorney Daniel L. Castillo about his client, Rick Ehlert, 45. Ehlert
  is "not denying he did it," Castillo says, but what he did shouldn't be
  considered a crime. He says Ehlert was drunk on a cruise ship headed
  for Tampa, Fla., when he broke into the control room and dropped the
  moving ship's anchor, and then tossed a life buoy overboard -- at 5:25
  a.m. The captain stopped the ship and assembled all passengers and crew
  on deck for a head count. No one was missing. "Everybody was mad at
  him," Castillo said, but "where's the crime?" The crime, federal
  prosecutors say, is attempting to damage the ship -- a statute that was
  strengthened after transportation-related terrorist attacks. Dropping
  anchor on a moving ship could damage it enough to cause it to sink. The
  719-foot MS Ryndam holds 1,260 passengers and 580 crew, and all were
  put in grave danger. Prosecutors are only calling for probation, but
  Castillo is trying to get him off in any case, noting "an alcohol-induced
  reckless act does not necessarily equate to a violation of federal
  criminal statutes." Also, Castillo added, "He's got a lot of money."
  (RC/Tampa Tribune) ...Oh, well, if he's got money, then by all means:
  let him commit "alcohol-induced reckless acts" with impunity.

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Crime news from around the world. Easy access to reported crimes & data.

We often have a need to access files on a plethara of criminal activities that involve not only habitual crimes of various descriptions but those of impulsive one off actions that result in a crime being committed by an individual in an unintentional or negligent way.

To collate these happenings and events one can collect them from many varied sources throughout the IT world and published media.

As there are many various aspects to criminal activities, we are in no way making any judgements as to the guilt & nor innocence of any individual nor making any legal claims in giving legal/court advice or describing policies on our own, but reporting what we have accessed from what we deem to be reliable sources.

The reported crimes are catergorized in common headings for easy recognition

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