Crime Files Network

www.crimefiles.net/info.

Archive for the ‘FOOD DRINK’ Category

Arranged marriages are a standard practice in Pakistan and there’s no shortage of stories about the extreme steps some Pakistani women will take to escape them and marry the men they choose.

But few go as far as Aasia Bibi is alleged to have gone.

ooo

According to Pakistani authorities, the 21-year-old woman tried to slip poison into her new husband’s milk and inadvertently killed 17 of his family members in the process.

Bibi, who is charged with murder, appeared in court on Tuesday in the north-eastern city of Muzaffargarh, where she told reporters that her parents had forced her in September to marry a relative, Associated Press and ITV reported.

Her family live in nearby Ali Pur, a small village in eastern Pakistan.

“I repeatedly asked my parents not to marry me against my will as my religion, Islam, also allows me to choose the man of my choice for marriage, but my parents rejected all of my pleas,” AP quoted Bibi as saying.

She told them that she was willing to do anything to get out of the marriage, she added, but they refused to permit a divorce, ITV reported.

Desperate to get out of the arrangement, Bibi went to her boyfriend, Shahid Lashari, who gave her a “poisonous substance”, local police chief Sohail Habib Tajak told AP.

Last week, Tajak said, Bibi mixed the poison in milk and gave it to her husband, but he refused to drink it.

At some point after – and it’s not exactly clear how – Bibi’s mother-in-law used the tainted milk to make lassi, a yogurt-based drink popular in south Asia. When she served it to 27 members of her extended family, all of them lost consciousness and were taken to hospital.

Bibi and Lashari were arrested and charged with murder shortly after. Neither had lawyers, AP reported.

Seventeen of her intended husband’s family members have reportedly died in the past several days, including one young girl, and the other 10 are still in the hospital.

Bibi denied the allegations against her, saying Lashari told her to poison the milk, but she refused.

But in Tuesday’s court hearing, Bibi told reporters that she had in fact targeted her husband and regretted that others had died, according to AP.

Her boyfriend, she said, “asked me to mix it in something” and give it to the husband. He “said he will marry me”, she told a judge, according to ITV.

Tajak said he spent two weeks questioning Bibi and Lashari trying to find out who was responsible. Lashari had confessed to giving the young woman the poison, he said.

“Our officers have made progress by arresting a woman and her lover in connection with this murder case, which was complicated and challenging for us,” Tajak told AP.

The Washington Post

www.mylove-au.com

Henry Sapiecha

 

Budapest: President Vladimir Putin has sparked outrage not only from dissidents but from ordinary Russians and usually loyal supporters with an order that smuggled Western food should be “incinerated on the spot”.

Kremlin adviser Yevgeny Bobrov​ described the order as “high-handed” and analysts said it could go down badly in a country where a third of the population still lived in poverty.

Illegally imported food is destroyed in the Belgorod region, Russia image www.crimefiles.net
Illegally imported food is destroyed in the Belgorod region, Russia, on Thursday.Russians have been used for a year to seeing “cheese-like substance” rather than real cheddar on the supermarket shelves since President Putin declared an embargo on EU imports in retaliation for Western sanctions over Ukraine. But the order to actually destroy food came as a shock to many.
AdvertisementRussians were signing an online petition calling for the food to be given to the needy. “Why should we destroy food that could feed veterans, pensioners, the disabled, those with large families or those who have suffered from natural disasters?” said the appeal to the government.

President Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov, already embroiled in a scandal about the expensive watch he wore at his recent wedding, struck a note of “let them eat cake” indifference when he questioned whether the signatures on the petition had been verified.
President Vladimir Putin's order to destroy illegally imported food was implemented in the Belgorod region image www.crimefiles.net

President Vladimir Putin’s order to destroy illegally imported food was implemented in the Belgorod region on Thursday.

But there was no doubt about the identity of Vladimir Solovyov, a usually pro-Kremlin television host, who tweeted: “I don’t understand how a country that lived through the horrible hunger of the war and terrible years after the Revolution can destroy food.”

Solovyov hit the mark with this comment, for food occupies an almost sacred place in Russian culture.

Those who survived the wartime Siege of Leningrad (today’s St Petersburg), when the starving licked glue from the back of wallpaper for the protein, taught their children and grandchildren that it was a sin to throw away even a crust of stale bread. The message was reinforced by the Orthodox Church.

Members of Eat the Russian food movement check food at a Moscow food store image www.crimefiles.net

Members of “Eat the Russian food” movement check food at a Moscow food store this week. Photo: AP

One Russian wrote on Facebook: “My mother used to smack me if I wasted a piece of bread. She would cut out the bit where I’d left my teeth marks and save the rest of the slice for the next meal.”

For many, the President’s draconian measure will be all the harder to comprehend given than Mr Putin himself came from a poor family in St Petersburg. He claims now to be a devout Orthodox Christian and has repeatedly sought to bolster his power by evoking the wartime spirit.

Moral issues aside, the order to destroy food raised a host of economic questions.

When the embargo against imports was first introduced, the authorities portrayed it as a chance for Russia to develop its domestic agriculture and industry. Instead, a black market sprang up, as evidenced by spray-painted signs on the asphalt in Moscow, with the word “parmesan” and a mobile telephone number for anyone who was interested.

The new government order is for food to be destroyed “by any means that do not harm the environment”, almost an open invitation for the corrupt to fake food bonfires and divert goodies onto the black market.

As a compromise, some experts suggested reprocessing the high-quality, even gourmet food, into animal feed, which only brought more howls of protest from people who live on a basic diet of bread, boiled sausage and macaroni.

Undeterred, one high-ranking government official, Dmitry Chugunov, approved the idea of stiff jail sentences for food smugglers, saying: “If we don’t kick this food addiction, we will never learn to build worthy cheese factories for ourselves.”

President Putin has enjoyed sky-high ratings for years, in large part because of his ability to speak to the common man. But with his persecution of food, it seems he may have lost touch with the public.

“It’s started. In Samara [a city on the Volga River], they are burning pork. If you ask me, they [the powers that be] will break themselves over this one, the public execution of food,” wrote Olga Bakushinskaya, an opposition journalist who recently left Russia for Israel.

ooo
hs-sig-red-on-white

Packs of sliced beef ham and cheese are placed on the ground image www.crimefiles.net

Packs of sliced beef ham and cheese are placed on the ground as part of a display of illegally imported food falling under restrictions in St. Petersburg, earlier this month. Photo: REUTERS/Peter Kovalev

Moscow: Russian police said on Tuesday it had busted an international contraband cheese operation responsible for bringing 2 billion roubles ($40 million) of the embargoed product onto the domestic market.

Police seized 470 tons of the products, as well as label makers and “documents proving illegal activity,” during more than a dozen raids on warehouses, offices and residences apparently used by the group, according to a statement posted on the Interior Ministry’s website.

It said the Moscow-based ring illegally imported rennet products that it would falsely label as prestigious brand cheeses and sell to supermarkets and distribution centres in Moscow and St Petersburg.

bulldozer destroys illegally imported cheese in Belgorod region, Russia image www.crimefiles.net
A bulldozer destroys illegally imported cheese in Belgorod region, Russia, on August 6.
Two of the ring’s organisers and four other participants, aged 29 to 58, have been detained and face up to 10 years in prison for “especially large-scale fraud by an organised group,” police said.
Advertisement

Russia has banned imports of dairy products, as well as raw meat, fish, fruits and vegetables, from the European Union, the United States and several other Western countries that have imposed sanctions against Russia over its role in the Ukraine crisis.

When the embargo against imports was first introduced a year ago, the authorities portrayed it as a chance for Russia to develop its domestic agriculture and industry. Instead, a black market sprang up, as evidenced by spray-painted signs on the asphalt in Moscow, with the word “parmesan” and a mobile phone number for anyone who was interested.

specialist controls the process of cheese making at John Kopiski's farm in Krutovo village, east of Moscow image www.crimefiles.net

A specialist controls the process of cheese making at John Kopiski’s farm in Krutovo village, east of Moscow. Russia has marked the one-year anniversary of its ban on Western agricultural products with an order to destroy contraband food. Photo: AP

Earlier this month, Russia destroyed tonnes of imported cheese and other foods.

ooo
hs-sig-red-on-white
Subscribe to Crime Files Network