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Ashraf Kamal Makary.serial-rapist image www.crimefiles.net

A serial predator who hunted and raped young Korean women travelling and working in Australia has been sentenced to 18 years and six months in jail.

Ashraf Kamal Makary, 42, was on Friday sentenced in the Brisbane District Court after a jury found him guilty of two rapes, one attempted rape and three counts of administering a stupefying drug on Wednesday.

Justice Leanne Clare was scathing in her assessment of the Egypt-born offender, describing him as a “true serial predator” from whom the community needed protection.

Justice Clare said Makary deliberately hunted the young Korean women through a language exchange website, with the intention of raping them.

“You devised a wicked plan, you set a trap and you lured the prey,” she said.

The court heard Makary emailed and texted the women – who were aged 19, 20 and 24 – in the weeks leading up to April 2011, to encourage them to meet with him.

Justice Clare said he brought his own “rape kit” to the meetings, which included wine and sleeping tablets, with the intention of turning each woman into a “rag doll”.

Defence barrister Joshua Fenton had argued his client’s offending was less serious because there was no gratuitous violence involved.

However Justice Clare said Makary’s drugging of victims was the “most serious aspect” of his offending.

“The women were are your mercy,” she said.

“They were here in Australia for opportunity and adventure.

“Instead you stole the freedom and innocence of their youth.”

The court heard Makary had no prior criminal history, however he has since been convicted of another rape that occurred while he was on bail in April 2012.

He will be sentenced for that matter next week.

Justice Clare said although he had spent four years in pre-sentence custody, she would still impose a sentence of 18 years and six months.

“You took the opportunity while on bail to rape yet another woman,” she said.

“You only stopped because you were locked up.”

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Published on Jun 2, 2016

Serial killer Michael Madison’s death sentence an antidote for victims’ families
VIDEO: Victim’s father attacks serial killer Michael Madison during sentencing


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Jury sentences Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death

Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was sentenced to death by a U.S. jury on Friday for helping carry out the 2013 attack that killed three people and wounded 264 others in the crowds at the race’s finish line.

After deliberating for 15 hours, the federal jury chose death by lethal injection for Tsarnaev, 21, over its only other option: life in prison without possibility of release.

The same jury found Tsarnaev guilty last month of placing a pair of homemade pressure-cooker bombs on April 15, 2013, as well as fatally shooting a policeman. The bombing was one of the highest-profile attacks on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001.

Tsarnaev, dressed in a dark sport coat and light-colored shirt, stood quietly as the sentence was read, remaining expressionless as he had throughout most of the trial.

During 10 weeks of testimony, jurors heard from about 150 witnesses, including people whose legs were torn off by the shrapnel-filled bombs. William Richard, the father of bombing victim Martin Richard, described the decision to leave his 8-year-old son to die of his wounds so that he could save the life of his daughter, Jane, who lost a leg but survived.

Prosecutors described Tsarnaev, who is an ethnic Chechen, as an adherent of al Qaeda’s militant Islamist views who carried out the attack as an act of retribution for U.S. military campaigns in Muslim-majority countries.

The jury’s decision does not mean Tsarnaev will face imminent death. Defense attorneys are likely to appeal the sentence, a process that can stretch out for many years.

“I know that there is still a long road ahead,” said survivor Karen Brassard, whose left leg was badly injured in the attack. “There are going to be many, many dates ahead. But today we can take a breath, and actually breathe again,” she told reporters.

An appeal could focus on a number of issues, including the court’s denial of a defense plea to move the trial out of Boston or refusal to challenge the graphic photos and videos that the jury saw of the bombs’ detonation and the severe wounds they inflicted.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is pictured in this handout photo presented as evidence by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston

“Prosecutors do have a burden of proof to show that people died, but the appeal argument would be that there is a balance to be struck and they went over that line,” said David Weinstein, an attorney in private practice who in prior jobs as a state and federal prosecutor brought death-penalty cases.

DEATH PENALTY CONTROVERSIAL IN MASSACHUSETTS

The death penalty remains highly controversial in Massachusetts, which has not put anyone to death in almost 70 years and which abolished capital punishment for state crimes in 1984. Tsarnaev was tried under federal law, which allows for lethal injection as a punishment.

Polls had shown that a majority of Boston-area residents opposed executing Tsarnaev.

Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev face image www.crimefiles.net

Opponents included Martin Richard’s parents, who said in an open letter to the Justice Department last month that they wanted Tsarnaev to face life in prison rather getting a death sentence that would likely lead to years of appeals, keep the defendant in the spotlight and prevent them from trying to rebuild their lives.

Just three of the 74 people sentenced to death in the United States for federal crimes since 1988 have been executed. The first was Timothy McVeigh, put to death in June 2001 for killing 168 people in his 1995 attack on the federal government office building in Oklahoma City.

Other people convicted of attacks labeled as terrorist by the U.S. government, including 9/11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui and shoe-bomber Richard Reid, drew life prison sentences.

Prosecutors focused heavily on Tsarnaev’s turn to radical Islamist views, showing the jury copies of the al Qaeda magazine article that demonstrated how to build a pressure-cooker bomb.

“The defendant claimed to be acting on behalf of all Muslims. This was not a religious crime,” said Carmen Ortiz, the top federal prosecutor in Boston. “It was a political crime designed to intimidate and coerce the United States.”

Tsarnaev’s attorneys admitted his involvement in the attack from the start of the trial, but argued that he was a junior partner in a scheme hatched and run by his 26-year-old brother, Tamerlan. Tamerlan died after a gunfight with police four days after the bombing, which ended when Dzhokhar ran him over with a stolen car.

A Roman Catholic nun who is a prominent opponent of the death penalty, Sister Helen Prejean, testified for the defense she had met with Tsarnaev and he told her “no one deserves to suffer” as his victims had. Prejean, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, said she believed he was “genuinely sorry” for his actions.

But the jury found Tsarnaev deserved execution for six of the 17 capital charges of which he was found guilty. Those counts were the ones tied to the bomb that he personally placed at the marathon finish line, which killed Richard and 23-year-old Chinese exchange student Lingzi Lu.

They did not find him deserving of death for the crimes tied to the bomb placed by his brother, which killed 29-year-old restaurant manager Krystle Campbell, or for the fatal shooting of Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Sean Collier, 26.

Tsarnaev’s attorney’s left the courthouse without commenting to reporters.

Tsarnaev himself was impassive throughout the trial, and did not testify in his own defense. He showed emotion only once, when his 64-year-old aunt, Patimat Suleimanova, who had traveled from Russia to testify, broke down in tears on the witness stand upon seeing her nephew. She was unable to compose herself and was excused.

Judy Clarke, defense attorney for Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, walks out of the federal courthouse in Boston

Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his defense attorney Judy Clarke (2nd R) are shown in a courtroom sketch after he is sentenced at the federal courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts May 15, 2015.
Reuters/Jane Flavell Collins
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Accused: Lian Bin "Robert" Xie.

Accused: Lian Bin “Robert” Xie. Photo: Danielle Smith

Shortly before Robert Xie allegedly murdered five people, a young woman told her friend he had inappropriately touched her, a court has heard.

The subject came “completely out of the blue” while the two women were lying down and talking in a tent during a camping trip in the Illawara region, the NSW Supreme Court heard on Monday.

The friend gave evidence that about two years earlier she had told the woman that she had been sexually abused.

And the woman then revealed that “something similar” had happened to her.
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The friend told the court: “We were just lying there. I suppose we were just talking and she asked me: ‘How come I can remain so normal.’ ”

The court heard that the woman then went on to say: “You know what happened … something similar I suppose you would say happened to me.

“I don’t want to talk about it but it was similar.”

The alleged conversation happened in April, May or June of 2009, the court heard.

Mr Xie is on trial for murdering his brother-in-law Min “Norman” Lin, Min’s wife Yun, “Lilly”, her sister Yun Bin “Irene” Lin and Lilly’s two sons Terry and Henry in their North Epping home on July 18, 2009.

The woman, who cannot be identified, has previously given evidence that Mr Xie touched her sexually before the killings and sexually abused her afterwards.

The friend gave evidence that after the conversation in the tent, the woman tried to avoid the subject and would “walk off” or “brush it off”.

“I did ask her once in a while,” the friend said.

“She would say I’m busy or she would run off, she would avoid that in general or anything to do with that topic.

“I told her I would always be here if she ever wanted to ask me questions or if she wanted to talk about it, she could talk to me.”

When the friend was questioned by police at her home after the killings, she mentioned the conversation the two had shared at the camp.

Mr Xie has pleaded not guilty to murder in relation to the killings.

The Crown has argued that his sexual interest in the young woman was one of his motives for the killings.

The hearing continues.

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A Pakistani rape victim says she has been forced to seek justice after the rapists filmed and released the video of the act online

When a young Pakistani woman was gang raped in a remote village, she kept silent. But then a video of the rape began circulating online and via mobile phone. As BBC Urdu’s Amber Shamsi reports, little appears to have been done to stop web users from sharing the video.

Sadia (not her real name) had thought that if she kept quiet, it might protect her from the humiliation of being known as a rape victim.

But in the days or weeks after, two versions of her ordeal began to circulate online – one lasted five minutes, the other 40 minutes.

The video showed her being raped by four men, one by one, while she pleaded for mercy. It spread rapidly through the towns and villages of Punjab.

“It was my elder brother who first told me about the video. He saw it and recognised Sadia, then came to me,” Sadia’s father says.

“She felt too ashamed to tell me because I’m her father. If her mother had been alive, I’m sure my daughter would have told her.”

They then reported the rape, and it was easy to find the alleged culprits in that small community.

‘Sharing’ the rape

It was shared largely through Bluetooth and clips have reportedly made it on to social media websites such as Facebook.

It can still be shared. Pakistan does not have the laws to stop this from happening.

Sadia lives in a typical Pakistani village, with mud homes surrounded by fields of sugarcane and small vegetable gardens.

She is 23 but she looks much younger. Since her mother died, she has been a surrogate mother to her younger siblings.

Sadia

Sadia says the public nature of her ordeal has left her unwilling to leave her home

Sadia is nervous as she speaks, clasping and unclasping her hands, breaking down and re-composing herself.

She says she was on her way to the market to buy her sister’s school uniform when she was bundled into a car and threatened with a gun. She claims the four men in the car took her to a house and raped her while filming the act on a mobile phone.

“After I begged and pleaded with them, they beat me even more,” she says. “They said to me that if I don’t listen to them and do what they want, they’ll show everyone the video, put it up on the internet, that they would hurt my brothers and sister.

“I didn’t care about myself but I didn’t want my siblings’ future to be in jeopardy because of me. That’s why I didn’t tell anyone.”

She is acutely aware the video is now being watched widely.

“A lot of people are watching this video for fun, they see it as something interesting.”

Cyber crime laws

When I came face to face with the four accused men in the police station where they were being held on remand, they hung their heads to avoid our gaze. They are currently in jail and the trial is under way.

Four suspects in custody

The four suspects are in custody, and their trial has begun

As well as being prosecuted for gang-rape and kidnap, they have also been charged with distributing pornography for which the penalty is three months in jail.

The video is still online although police say they have been trying to get it removed. As far as the gang-rape is concerned, police say that with the video, the case is strong

But this is also a story that underscores how Pakistan’s legal system has been unable to keep pace with rapid changes in society and technology.

Lawyers specialising in cyber crime say there is no specific law to force websites to take down the video, and a lack of political will and manpower means this could still be some way off.

A comprehensive cyber-crime ordinance was allowed to lapse four years ago before it could become law.

So local police and federal agents adopt a piecemeal approach when confronted with a crime like the filming and sharing of a video containing sexual violence and invoke laws pertaining to sexual harassment, defamation or criminal intimidation or basic clauses on violation of privacy gleaned from an old law called the Electronic Transactions Ordinance (ETO).

Under a new cyber-crime law (yet to be enacted by parliament), the punishment for distributing sexually explicit material will be three years – whether or not it involves violence which is dealt with under separate laws – and violation of privacy is also three years

A deputy director-general with the central Federal Investigation Agency which covers cyber crime, Shehzad Haider, says he gets about 12 to 15 cases of private videos of a sexual nature being uploaded a month – by jilted lovers and blackmailing gangs – and the numbers appear to be increasing.

“The law which was allowed to lapse was very effective because it was detailed and made the job of prosecution much easier,” says Mr Haider. “We make do with the ETO because we have no choice.”

Sadia has no choice either. She is now house-bound because of the shame of the public nature of her ordeal. She used to be a primary-school teacher and had been in further study.

“Some of my college professors visited me and encouraged me to complete my studies,” she says.

“They say I should put it behind me, but I can’t. Not until the men are punished.”

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How the crime came to light: Tahir Imran Mian, Social Media editor, BBC Urdu

“I have something to share with you and I hope the BBC can help the victim.” That was the message attached to a video from a reader of the BBC Urdu Facebook page.

It is one the biggest and most followed pages in Pakistan and a huge number of people reach out to us for help. We are often sent graphic material, but I felt numb after seeing the shocking video so decided to investigate.

After a few phone calls and conversations, it dawned on me that people were watching and sharing this. I then found that many men in the area where the attack took place thought it was “fun” to share and watch the video.

There are several closed groups on Facebook where men can share images. Those who have access to tools and technology can take it further and blackmail victims. A mobile phone with a camera is cheap and so are the opportunities it provides to many who knowingly or unknowingly record their videos and then share them.

The victim often ends up being the one stigmatised.

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Henry Sapiecha

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Former Anglo American mining executive Glenn Tonkin

Anglo American is pursuing a former Brisbane-based executive in a civil suit in Brisbane’s Supreme Court.

A FRAUD claim against a senior Queensland mining boss has ballooned with his employer accusing him of stealing more than twice as much as previously thought.

Glenn James Tonkin, 50, from Mount Samson, west of Brisbane, was accused in September of rorting $4.5 million from global mining giant Anglo American’s Queensland coal business between 2013 and 2014.

After swiftly freezing his assets and hiring investigators to probe his past, shortly before Christmas the company slapped him with another $5.3 million damages claim — alleging he also rorted the company when he worked to expand a copper mine in South America between 2009 and 2011.

Tonkin is accused of using an elaborate scheme of fake invoices to secretly siphon company money to his offshore bank accounts in the Caribbean and Hong Kong, according to documents filed in a civil suit in Brisbane’s Supreme Court.

The claims arose in September while he was on a $315,000 salary working as the project manager of a central Queensland mine — where he had the power to approve payments to contractors.

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In documents filed to the court, his work colleagues at Anglo’s Brisbane CBD office and its mine project in central Queensland claimed he had been on a spending spree — buying a 50-foot catamaran worth nearly $1 million, a Harley Davidson and a Mercedes.

A colleague who worked as a construction manager at the Grosvenor mine, Greg O’Donnell said that Tonkin telephoned him in late August to boast about buying a Harley.

“He said to me … he had bought a (new) Harley Davidson ‘breakout’ motorcycle. He said (it was) blue because everyone has a red one.

“He said he bought the top model and (he had purchased upgrades).”

Mr O’Donnell also claimed Tonkin had boasted about his boat and had arranged a sailing trip for a dozen colleagues from the Royal Queensland Yacht Squadron in Manly in February 2013, documents show.

“He said that … it was quite large … and it could berth himself and his wife on one side and children on the other.”

Another colleague, commercial manager Stephen Grant said he went to a Christmas party at Tonkin’s Mount Samson home.

“Mr Tonkin’s home is very impressive and well presented … (it) is on a large number of hectares and has a large entertaining area, a pool and a very substantial home theatre,” Grant stated in the court documents.

Tonkin’s impressive property portfolio also includes a home in Holland Park in Brisbane’s southeast.

Mr Grant said he was surprised when Tonkin drove to work on what would be his last day at the company in “what appeared to be a brand new (black) Mercedes”.

“Mr Tonkin said the car was an asset of his family trust,” Mr Grant said.

Mr Grant said Tonkin told him the car was bought “to solve a tax problem”.

It is alleged that Tonkin approached contractors to the Australian and South American mining projects asking them to pay a company he secretly owned for phantom equipment or consultancy work.

The contractors didn’t know they were being used by Tonkin to try and hide his alleged fraud.

The contractors would later pass on the charges to Anglo American and Tonkin would green light payment. No equipment or services were allegedly ever provided, but amid mine projects worth billions the $9.8 million was allegedly not missed.

Court files show Anglo spent $US2.8 billion expanding the Los Bronces mine in Chile — and of this $500 million was with contracts entered directly by Anglo staff such as Tonkin.

It appears Tonkin didn’t see the allegations coming because on the day he was confronted by his bosses and chose to resign, he emailed contractor Andrew Barnes thanking him for his help.

“The payment was all completed … thanks for your help with this, I owe you a bottle of red,” Tonkin wrote.

Tonkin is expected to deny the allegations and defend the claim.

In the case involving the alleged payments from the coal mine development in Queensland, he has claimed “self-incrimination privilege against the production of some documents and information”.

Anglo succeeded in getting court permission to search his Mount Samson home.

And on October 24, he also chose to voluntarily transfer $3.2 million from his Hong Kong bank account to the lawyers acting for Anglo — a move that Anglo claims “amounts to an admission”.

The alleged con unravelled in mid-August after an eagle-eyed colleague Phillipa Starmer noticed one of her emails had been altered. After an investigation, the HR department found it was likely Tonkin was responsible.

Tonkin admitted he had breached procurement guidelines — a relatively minor misdeed — but rather than stand aside while he was investigated Tonkin chose to resign.

When the HR boss began digging, he found the US consultant named in the email — Hank Testolin — didn’t exist. Alarm bells rang.

In November Anglo sent its lawyer to Santiago in Chile to interview potential witnesses in the case against Tonkin.

The case returns to court on January 29.

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Quinn De Campe, 16, was bashed to death.image www.crimefiles.net

Quinn De Campe, 16, was bashed to death.

The sentence handed to a trio of teenagers who fatally bashed a 16-year-old boy during a staged drug deal in Perth is irrelevant, his parents say, because it won’t bring back their only son.

Quinn De Campe died the day after being bashed, kneed and kicked by the three teens who lured him to a park to sell him cannabis in December last year.

Judge Denis Reynolds sentenced the three attackers on Thursday to six and a half years in jail for manslaughter, to be served concurrently with a four year sentence for aggravated armed robbery.

The fourth boy was sentenced to three-and-a-half years behind bars.

“The sentence is irrelevant – nothing is going to change what’s happened,” Quinn’s father Vaughan De Campe told reporters outside court.

But he and wife Shelley said it was important to discourage and hopefully diminish such senseless crimes, seen all too often on the streets.

“Quinn grew up to believe that people’s differences were to be celebrated and not judged. Ultimately, it led to him losing his life,” they said.

“Regardless of the sentence handed down today, it will never change the fact that our son has lost his life in a cowardly and brutal attack that was perpetrated by juveniles.

“It is us and our family that will live with this life sentence. Nothing will ever take away the pain of losing Quinn, our only child.”

Judge Reynolds said the offending was an extremely serious example of its kind because Quinn had been lured to an isolated location and left there severely injured after being outnumbered three to one.

“The three of you were persistent,” he said.

“The three of you were unrelenting.

“Your whole focus was to get the money.”

The teenagers planned to rob Quinn when they lured him to the Balga bush reserve and – brandishing a broken bottle – assaulted him after he refused to give up his belongings, which included $175 to buy the cannabis.

Quinn was punched, kneed and kicked so hard it left a shoe imprint on his head and caused his attacker to limp.

He was chased down when he tried to run away and was found bleeding, bruised and unconscious. He died in hospital the next day.

His attackers, who were around the same age, were initially charged with grievous bodily harm but that was later upgraded to murder.

They last month pleaded guilty to manslaughter – a plea bargain accepted by the prosecution.

Along with the fourth boy, they also pleaded guilty to aggravated armed robbery.

Judge Reynolds said all the offenders had been initially remorseless, with one lying “big time” to police.

They had all developed remorse during the 11 months they have already served at Banksia Hill Juvenile Detention Centre, but in each case, that was overlaid with regret for the impact on themselves, he said.

All will be eligible for parole after serving half of their terms.

– AAP

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Australia is doing it’s job well in  tracking down a terrorism element in the community & having her charged.

The wife [Fatima] of this terrorist Mohamed Elomar has been nabbed arrested & charged by the Australian Federal Police

If found guilty we cannot afford to be seen to be weak in our penalty application to all terrorists.

Bullets are cheap.

Let them leave here & never ever to return. Keeping them here under detention costs us money.

They say an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth & maybe a head for a head for us to stay ahead

Mohamed Elomar, suspected to be in Syria or Iraq image www.crimefiles.net

Mohamed Elomar, suspected to be in Syria or Iraq; his wife has been charged with supporting incursions into a foreign state.

Police say they have phone records and surveillance footage to back up their case against the wife of suspected Islamic State fighter Mohamed Elomar.

Fatima Elomar was arrested by counter-terrorism detectives in May as she tried to board a flight to Malaysia with her four children.

Police allege she was carrying cash and supplies, including camouflage gear, GPS watches, money and some medical supplies on behalf of her husband, who is in Syria and reportedly fighting with the terror group.

Mohamed Elomar and his fellow Australian fighter Khaled Sharrouf recently posted images on Twitter, showing them posing with the heads of executed fighters, holding guns and standing over bloodied bodies.

Ms Elomar is yet to enter a plea. The 29-year-old is charged under the Crimes (Foreign Incursions and Recruitment) Act with supporting incursions into a foreign state with the intention of engaging in hostile activities.

On Tuesday, the Downing Centre Local Court was told a committal hearing cannot proceed without written permission of the Attorney-General. That consent was being sought, Magistrate John Bailey was told.

Her lawyer, Zali Burrows, has previously said Ms Elomar was heading overseas for a family reunion.

The case will return to court in November.

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BIG TIME MAFIA LIKE CRIME BOSS IN CHINA GETS THE DEATH PENALTY

Liu Han former-chinese-mining-mogul-sentenced-to-death www.crimefiles.net

A former Chinese mining mogul was sentenced to death on Friday after being found guilty of leading a mafia-style operation in the southwestern Chinese province of Sichuan, state-news agency Xinhua reports.

Liu Han — the former chairman of unlisted Sichuan Hanlong Group and once among the richest people in China— and his brother, Liu Wei were accused of ordering nine murders. They also faced charges of assault, extortion, illegal detention and running a local gambling ring with 34 other gang members, one of the largest criminal gangs to be tried in China in recent years.

“Liu Han and Liu Wei were deeply evil,” the court said in its sentence, according to The New York Times. “Their means were extremely cruel, their impact on society was extremely bad.”

Prosecutors say their criminal activities, dating to 1993, helped them amass $6.4bn in assets with businesses in finance, energy, property and mining.

In March, Chinese authorities reportedly seized $14.5 billion dollars worth of assets from the Han’s family members and associates. In addition, more than 300 of his relatives and former colleagues were also reportedly questioned.

Han’s company, a diversified firm with interests ranging from tourism to minerals and assets of more than $3.2 billion, pursued a number of international mining deals.

A few of them have already fizzled, including the $5 billion Mbalam iron ore project straddling Cameroon and Congo-Brazzaville in Central Africa with Australia’s Sundance Resources (ASX:SDL), a deal to develop an iron ore and copper-molybdenum mine with Moly Mines (ASX:MOL) in the Pilbara and another molybdenum project with US-based General Moly (NYSE:GMO), of which it owned 25%.

“Framed”

Liu Han, 48, was found guilty of 13 serious charges, including murder, running casinos and illegally selling firearms.

His younger brother, Liu Wei, will also face death row.

Upon hearing the sentence Han yelled to the court he had been “framed” and “wronged,” before being taken away by guards

Upon hearing the sentence Han yelled to the court he had been “framed” and “wronged,” before being taken away by guards, the South China Morning Post reports.

former-chinese-mining-mogul-liu-han-sentenced-to-death www.crimefiles.net

According to earlier reports, police seized hand grenades, half-dozen submachine guns, 20 pistols and other firearms.

The penalties on Friday come amid an anti-corruption crackdown launched by the president, Xi Jinping, that has reached senior politicians and influential businessmen.

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