Crime Files Network

www.crimefiles.net/info.

Archive for the ‘Pakistan’ Category

Arranged marriages are a standard practice in Pakistan and there’s no shortage of stories about the extreme steps some Pakistani women will take to escape them and marry the men they choose.

But few go as far as Aasia Bibi is alleged to have gone.

ooo

According to Pakistani authorities, the 21-year-old woman tried to slip poison into her new husband’s milk and inadvertently killed 17 of his family members in the process.

Bibi, who is charged with murder, appeared in court on Tuesday in the north-eastern city of Muzaffargarh, where she told reporters that her parents had forced her in September to marry a relative, Associated Press and ITV reported.

Her family live in nearby Ali Pur, a small village in eastern Pakistan.

“I repeatedly asked my parents not to marry me against my will as my religion, Islam, also allows me to choose the man of my choice for marriage, but my parents rejected all of my pleas,” AP quoted Bibi as saying.

She told them that she was willing to do anything to get out of the marriage, she added, but they refused to permit a divorce, ITV reported.

Desperate to get out of the arrangement, Bibi went to her boyfriend, Shahid Lashari, who gave her a “poisonous substance”, local police chief Sohail Habib Tajak told AP.

Last week, Tajak said, Bibi mixed the poison in milk and gave it to her husband, but he refused to drink it.

At some point after – and it’s not exactly clear how – Bibi’s mother-in-law used the tainted milk to make lassi, a yogurt-based drink popular in south Asia. When she served it to 27 members of her extended family, all of them lost consciousness and were taken to hospital.

Bibi and Lashari were arrested and charged with murder shortly after. Neither had lawyers, AP reported.

Seventeen of her intended husband’s family members have reportedly died in the past several days, including one young girl, and the other 10 are still in the hospital.

Bibi denied the allegations against her, saying Lashari told her to poison the milk, but she refused.

But in Tuesday’s court hearing, Bibi told reporters that she had in fact targeted her husband and regretted that others had died, according to AP.

Her boyfriend, she said, “asked me to mix it in something” and give it to the husband. He “said he will marry me”, she told a judge, according to ITV.

Tajak said he spent two weeks questioning Bibi and Lashari trying to find out who was responsible. Lashari had confessed to giving the young woman the poison, he said.

“Our officers have made progress by arresting a woman and her lover in connection with this murder case, which was complicated and challenging for us,” Tajak told AP.

The Washington Post

www.mylove-au.com

Henry Sapiecha

 

Quetta: At least 59 people were killed and 117 critically wounded when gunmen stormed a Pakistani police training academy in the south-western city of Quetta, government officials said on Tuesday.

Some 200 trainees were stationed at the facility when the attack occurred late on Monday, officials said, and some were taken hostage during the attack, which lasted five hours.

Many dead at Pakistan police academy

Dozens of police cadets are dead and scores more wounded after gunmen stormed in on a police academy in the city of Quetta.

Most of the dead were police cadets.

Mir Sarfraz Bugti, home minister of Baluchistan province, of which Quetta is the capital, had confirmed early on Tuesday that five to six gunmen had attacked a dormitory inside the training facility while cadets rested and slept.

No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack, but one of the top military commanders in Baluchistan, General Sher Afgun, told media that calls intercepted between the attackers and their handlers suggested they were from the sectarian militant group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi.

“We came to know from the communication intercepts that there were three militants who were getting instructions from Afghanistan,” General Afgun told media, adding that the al-Alami cell of Lashkar-e-Jhangvi was behind the attack.

Baluchistan, particularly against  minority Hazara Shiites. It was unclear what motive the group would have in attacking the police academy, a home ministry official said.

Police, military and paramilitary personnel arrived at the training centre within 20 minutes of the attack and launched an operation which last around five hours, the home ministry said.

Pakistani volunteer medics rush an injured person to a hospital in Quetta after the police academy attack image www.crimefiles.net

Pakistani volunteer medics rush an injured person to a hospital in Quetta after the police academy attack.  Photo: AP

A Reuters photographer at the scene said authorities carried out the body of a teenage boy who they said was one of the attackers and had been shot dead by security forces.

Well-coordinated attack

An injured Pakistani commando lies down on a bed at a local hospital image www.crimefiles.net

An injured Pakistani commando lies down on a bed at a local hospital, who was transferred after gunmen attacked a police training center in a suburban area of the provincial capital of Quetta, Pakistan, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Gunmen stormed a police training center in the restive southwestern province of Baluchistan Monday, leaving scores of people killed and many wounded, authorities said. (AP Photo/Arshad Butt) Photo: ARSHAD BUTT

Monday night’s assault was the deadliest in Pakistan since a suicide bomber killed more than 70 people in an attack on mourners gathered at a hospital in Quetta in August.

The bomber struck as a crowd of mostly lawyers and journalists crammed into the emergency ward of the hospital to accompany the body of a prominent lawyer who had been shot and killed in the city earlier that day.

Pakistani troops enter the police academy in response to the terror attack in Baluchistan province image www.crimefiles.net

Pakistani troops enter the police academy in response to the terror attack in Baluchistan province. Photo: AP

Monday night’s attack also appeared well coordinated, with senior law enforcement agencies saying that assailants had fired at the police training centre from five different points.

The attackers then entered the centre’s hostel, where around 200 to 250 police recruits were resting, security officials said. At least three explosions were reported at the scene by local media

Supporters of a Pakistani religious group suggest that August's suicide attack in Quetta was carried out by RAW, the foreign intelligence agency of neighbouring India image www.crimefiles.net

Supporters of a Pakistani religious group suggest that August’s suicide attack in Quetta was carried out by RAW, the foreign intelligence agency of neighbouring India. Photo: AP

Quetta has long been regarded as a base for the Afghan Taliban, whose leadership has regularly held meetings there in the past.

The Afghan Taliban’s new leader, Haibatullah Akhundzada, openly taught and preached at a mosque outside Quetta for 15 years, until May this year. Akhundzada’s predecessor, Mullah Akhtar Mansour, was killed by a US drone strike while travelling to Quetta from the Pakistan-Iran border.

Members of Pakistan's Shiite minority flagellate themselves with knives as part of their ritual morning for Ashura in Quetta image www.crimefiles.net

Members of Pakistan’s Shiite minority flagellate themselves with knives as part of their ritual morning for Ashura in Quetta earlier this month. Photo: AP

Baluchistan province is no stranger to violence, with separatist fighters launching regular attacks on security forces for nearly a decade and the military striking back.

Militants, particularly sectarian groups, have also launched a campaign of suicide bombings and assassinations of minority Shiites.

Reuters, EFE

www.intelagencies.com

Beautiful_Russian_1_728_90 Russian_Girl_2_728_90

hs-sig-red-on-white

 

A Pakistani rape victim says she has been forced to seek justice after the rapists filmed and released the video of the act online

When a young Pakistani woman was gang raped in a remote village, she kept silent. But then a video of the rape began circulating online and via mobile phone. As BBC Urdu’s Amber Shamsi reports, little appears to have been done to stop web users from sharing the video.

Sadia (not her real name) had thought that if she kept quiet, it might protect her from the humiliation of being known as a rape victim.

But in the days or weeks after, two versions of her ordeal began to circulate online – one lasted five minutes, the other 40 minutes.

The video showed her being raped by four men, one by one, while she pleaded for mercy. It spread rapidly through the towns and villages of Punjab.

“It was my elder brother who first told me about the video. He saw it and recognised Sadia, then came to me,” Sadia’s father says.

“She felt too ashamed to tell me because I’m her father. If her mother had been alive, I’m sure my daughter would have told her.”

They then reported the rape, and it was easy to find the alleged culprits in that small community.

‘Sharing’ the rape

It was shared largely through Bluetooth and clips have reportedly made it on to social media websites such as Facebook.

It can still be shared. Pakistan does not have the laws to stop this from happening.

Sadia lives in a typical Pakistani village, with mud homes surrounded by fields of sugarcane and small vegetable gardens.

She is 23 but she looks much younger. Since her mother died, she has been a surrogate mother to her younger siblings.

Sadia

Sadia says the public nature of her ordeal has left her unwilling to leave her home

Sadia is nervous as she speaks, clasping and unclasping her hands, breaking down and re-composing herself.

She says she was on her way to the market to buy her sister’s school uniform when she was bundled into a car and threatened with a gun. She claims the four men in the car took her to a house and raped her while filming the act on a mobile phone.

“After I begged and pleaded with them, they beat me even more,” she says. “They said to me that if I don’t listen to them and do what they want, they’ll show everyone the video, put it up on the internet, that they would hurt my brothers and sister.

“I didn’t care about myself but I didn’t want my siblings’ future to be in jeopardy because of me. That’s why I didn’t tell anyone.”

She is acutely aware the video is now being watched widely.

“A lot of people are watching this video for fun, they see it as something interesting.”

Cyber crime laws

When I came face to face with the four accused men in the police station where they were being held on remand, they hung their heads to avoid our gaze. They are currently in jail and the trial is under way.

Four suspects in custody

The four suspects are in custody, and their trial has begun

As well as being prosecuted for gang-rape and kidnap, they have also been charged with distributing pornography for which the penalty is three months in jail.

The video is still online although police say they have been trying to get it removed. As far as the gang-rape is concerned, police say that with the video, the case is strong

But this is also a story that underscores how Pakistan’s legal system has been unable to keep pace with rapid changes in society and technology.

Lawyers specialising in cyber crime say there is no specific law to force websites to take down the video, and a lack of political will and manpower means this could still be some way off.

A comprehensive cyber-crime ordinance was allowed to lapse four years ago before it could become law.

So local police and federal agents adopt a piecemeal approach when confronted with a crime like the filming and sharing of a video containing sexual violence and invoke laws pertaining to sexual harassment, defamation or criminal intimidation or basic clauses on violation of privacy gleaned from an old law called the Electronic Transactions Ordinance (ETO).

Under a new cyber-crime law (yet to be enacted by parliament), the punishment for distributing sexually explicit material will be three years – whether or not it involves violence which is dealt with under separate laws – and violation of privacy is also three years

A deputy director-general with the central Federal Investigation Agency which covers cyber crime, Shehzad Haider, says he gets about 12 to 15 cases of private videos of a sexual nature being uploaded a month – by jilted lovers and blackmailing gangs – and the numbers appear to be increasing.

“The law which was allowed to lapse was very effective because it was detailed and made the job of prosecution much easier,” says Mr Haider. “We make do with the ETO because we have no choice.”

Sadia has no choice either. She is now house-bound because of the shame of the public nature of her ordeal. She used to be a primary-school teacher and had been in further study.

“Some of my college professors visited me and encouraged me to complete my studies,” she says.

“They say I should put it behind me, but I can’t. Not until the men are punished.”

line

How the crime came to light: Tahir Imran Mian, Social Media editor, BBC Urdu

“I have something to share with you and I hope the BBC can help the victim.” That was the message attached to a video from a reader of the BBC Urdu Facebook page.

It is one the biggest and most followed pages in Pakistan and a huge number of people reach out to us for help. We are often sent graphic material, but I felt numb after seeing the shocking video so decided to investigate.

After a few phone calls and conversations, it dawned on me that people were watching and sharing this. I then found that many men in the area where the attack took place thought it was “fun” to share and watch the video.

There are several closed groups on Facebook where men can share images. Those who have access to tools and technology can take it further and blackmail victims. A mobile phone with a camera is cheap and so are the opportunities it provides to many who knowingly or unknowingly record their videos and then share them.

The victim often ends up being the one stigmatised.

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

hs-sig-red-on-white

 

PAKISTANI GRAVE OF MURDERED WOMAN IMAGE www.crimefiles.net

Pakistani police denied negligence on Saturday over their failure to stop the bludgeoning to death of a woman outside a courthouse, describing it as a simple murder case despite a chorus of global condemnation.

Farzana Parveen died after she was set upon by more than two dozen attackers armed with bricks outside Lahore’s High Court on Tuesday, including numerous relatives, for marrying against her family’s wishes.

Police were present at the scene but did not stop the mob killing Parveen, who was three months pregnant.

Parveen’s father Mohammad Azeem was detained at the scene of the attack. Four others, including an uncle, two of her cousins, and a driver were arrested late Thursday.

Senior officer Zulfiqar Hameed defended his men’s actions, saying one had snatched a gun from an attacker, but claimed the mob was too large for police to stop the killing. He also blamed foreign media for their “inaccurate” description of events.

“It is a routine murder case like other murder cases and has to be seen in the context of Pakistani society,” Hameed told AFP.

“The foreign media is wrongly describing it as stoning without seeing the background of the two families, which is not good and which resulted in this incident,” he added.

Hameed also claimed Parveen’s husband Mohammad Iqbal had absconded from justice for four years after murdering his wife, and alleged that Parveen eloped with him despite already being married.

Iqbal — who Thursday admitted he had strangled his first wife out of love for Parveen — had told AFP he wanted to see her attackers “killed with bricks”.

He was spared jail for his first wife’s murder because his sons persuaded her family to pardon him under Pakistan’s blood-money laws.

These allow a victim’s family to forgive the murderer, which makes prosecuting so-called “honour” cases difficult as the killer is usually a relative.

– ‘Abduction’ allegation against husband –

In a further complication to the case, defence lawyer Mansoor Khan Afridi on Saturday claimed Iqbal had abducted Parveen two years ago, when she was already married to her cousin Mazhar Iqbal.

“Mohammad Iqbal developed illicit relations with Farzana and used to visit her when her husband Mazhar Iqbal was not at home,” Afridi said. “Later Iqbal kidnapped her.”

The lawyer claimed Mohammad Iqbal then obtained another marriage certificate, a crime if Parveen was already married to another man, he said.

Afridi said that cases of abduction and unlawful marriage had already been registered with police.

A Pakistani court extended the custody of Parveen’s father on Saturday, giving police seven more days to investigate the crime, senior police official Omer Riaz Cheema told AFP.

Parveen was at court to testify in Iqbal’s defence when she was killed, after he was accused by her relatives of kidnapping her and forcing her into marriage.

Hundreds of women are murdered by their relatives in Pakistan each year in the name of defending family “honour”.

But the brazen, brutal nature of Parveen’s killing, in broad daylight in the centre of Pakistan’s second largest city, has triggered outrage around the world.

Officers made the later arrests after Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif demanded immediate action on the case.

Last year, 869 women died in so-called “honour killings”, according to the independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan.

hs-sig-red-on-white

Subscribe to Crime Files Network