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A NORTH Korean defector has revealed she saw 11 musicians “blown to bits” by anti-aircraft guns in a terrifying execution ordered by maniacal dictator Kim Jong-un.

Hee Yeon Lim, 26, the daughter of a high-ranking soldier from Pyongyang, fled to South Korea last year and has told of the horrors she witnessed while part of the secretive Kim regime’s inner circle.

Speaking with The Mirror, she described one occasion where she was pulled out of school by soldiers and forced to watch a group of musicians accused of making a pornographic video being slaughtered.

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s nuclear ambitions have shocked the world. Picture: Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP

Hee Yeon said she and her classmates were taken to a stadium at the city’s Military Academy where the hooded and gagged victims were tied to the end of anti-aircraft guns in front of some 10,000 spectators.

The escapee then recalled how the guns were fired one by one, saying: “The musicians just disappeared each time the guns were fired into them. Their bodies were blown to bits, totally destroyed, blood and bits flying everywhere.”

Afterwards, Hee Yeon said tanks moved in and ran over the pieces of the victims’ bodies.

She added: “The tracks of the tanks were run over the remains and blood repeatedly, over and over again and made to grind the remains, to smash them into the ground until there was nothing left.”

Left feeling “desperately ill” after the grim spectacle, she later decided to escape the country.

When her father, Colonel Wui Yeon Lim, 51, passed away, she and her family fled the hermit kingdom to China in 2015 before arriving in South Korea capital Seoul last year.

The family paid people smugglers to drive them across the border to China, before travelling on to South Korea via Laos.

And despite her family’s relative privilege, Hee Yeon said she witnessed many other “terrible things” in her home city of Pyongyang — including dictator Kim’s use of teenage sex slaves.

US President Donald Trump (left) has dubbed North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “Rocket Man”. Picture: AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

She said officials came to her school to pick out teen schoolgirls to work at the dictator’s homes.

The escapee said they would only choose the prettiest girls, who were taught to feed him caviar and massage his body. If they refused they would “disappear”, she said.

Hee Yeon — who has met the terrifying despot — also told how he would gorge on imported delicacies like caviar and Chinese “Bird’s Nest Soup” which can cost $3300 per kilo.

In 2016, a shock report estimated tyrant Kim had executed 340 people since coming to power in 2011.

Of those killed, nearly half were senior officers in his own government, military and the ruling Korean Worker’s Party.

The brutal punishments meted out for “crimes” including having a “bad attitude”, treachery and for one poor party member slouching in a meeting.

In his debut speech to the United Nations on Monday, US President Donald Trump threatened to “totally destroy North Korea” after referring to Kim as “Rocket Man”.

The Institute for National Security Strategy — a South Korean think tank — released “The misgoverning of Kim Jong-un’s five years in power” detailing how he uses executions to tighten his grip on power.

Earlier this year, the country’s top schools official was executed by firing squad after he exercised a “bad attitude” at the country’s Supreme People’s Assembly in June.

In May 2015, Kim had defence minister Hyon Yong-chol killed with an anti-aircraft gun at a military school in Pyongyang, in front of an audience which included his own family who were reportedly made to watch the slaughter.

Kim’s half-brother, Kim Jong-nam, was assassinated. Picture: AFP/Toshifumi Kitamura

Two years earlier, in 2013, Kim’s own uncle Jang Song-thaek was executed for trying to overthrow the government.

In February, South Korea’s spy agency claimed Kim brutally executed five senior officials with anti-aircraft guns because they made false reports which “enraged” him.

The National Intelligence Service made the claims in a private briefing to politicians just days after Kim’s estranged older half-brother Kim Jong-nam was poisoned in a suspected assassination believed to have been ordered by the dictator.

An investigation is ongoing but South Korea says it believes Kim Jong-un ordered the killing of his sibling on February 13 at Kuala Lumpur’s airport.

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RUSSIA REBUKES TRUMP OVER NORTH KOREA

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said he is “extremely concerned” after President Donald Trump told the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday he was prepared to “totally destroy” North Korea.

Mr Lavrov said Russia, which shares a border with North Korea, believes negotiations and diplomacy are the only way to resolve a crisis over Pyongyang’s missile program.

“If you simply condemn and threaten, then we’re going to antagonise countries over whom we want to exert influence,” said Mr Lavrov.

Russia’s rebuke comes as Mr Trump hit out at former US secretary of state Hillary Clinton over Kim’s despotic regime, tweeting: “After allowing North Korea to research and build Nukes while Secretary of State (Bill C also), Crooked Hillary now criticizes.”

Washington: US President Donald Trump issued a new threat to North Korea, saying the US military was “locked and loaded” as Pyongyang accused him of driving the Korean peninsula to the brink of nuclear war and world powers expressed alarm.

The Pentagon said the United States and South Korea would proceed as planned with a joint military exercise in 10 days, an action sure to further antagonise North Korea.

Trump, vacationing at his Bedminster, New Jersey, golf resort, again referred to North Korea’s leader in his latest bellicose remarks Friday evening Australia time. “Military solutions are now fully in place, locked and loaded, should North Korea act unwisely,” he wrote on Twitter. “Hopefully Kim Jong Un [sic] will find another path!”

The term “locked and loaded,” popularised in the 1949 war film “Sands of Iwo Jima” starring American actor John Wayne, refers to preparations for shooting a gun.

Asked later by reporters to explain the remark, Trump said: “Those words are very, very easy to understand.”

Again referring to Kim, Trump added, “If he utters one threat … or if he does anything with respect to Guam or any place else that’s an American territory or an American ally, he will truly regret it, and he will regret it fast.”

In remarks to reporters after a meeting with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, Trump said the situation with North Korea was “very dangerous and it will not continue.”

“We will see what happens. We think that lots of good things could happen, and we could also have a bad solution,” he said.

Despite the tough rhetoric, Trump insisted that “nobody loves a peaceful solution better than President Trump.”

Trump said he thought US allies South Korea and Japan were “very happy” with how he was handling the confrontation.

The president, a wealthy businessman and former reality television personality, sent his tweet after North Korean state news agency, KCNA, said in a statement that “Trump is driving the situation on the Korean peninsula to the brink of a nuclear war.”

Guam, the Pacific island that is a US territory, posted emergency guidelines on Friday to help residents prepare for any potential nuclear attack after a threat from North Korea to fire missiles in its vicinity.

Guam is home to a US air base, a Navy installation, a Coast Guard group and roughly 6000 US military personnel. KCNA said on Thursday the North Korean army would complete plans in mid-August to fire four intermediate-range missiles over Japan to land in the sea (30-40 km) from Guam.

Trump called the governor of Guam, Eddie Baza Calvo. “We are with you a thousand percent. You are safe,” Trump told Calvo, who posted a video of him speaking with the president on Facebook.

Washington wants to stop Pyongyang from developing nuclear missiles that could hit the United States. North Korea sees its nuclear arsenal as protection against the United States and its partners in Asia.

Trump said he was considering additional sanctions on North Korea, adding that they would be “very strong.” He gave no details and did not make clear whether he meant unilateral or multilateral sanctions.

US officials have said new US steps that would target Chinese banks and firms doing business with Pyongyang are in the works, but these have appeared to be put on hold to give Beijing time to show it is serious about enforcing new UN sanctions.

Trump said he did not want to talk about diplomatic “back channels” with North Korea after US media reports that Joseph Yun, the US envoy for North Korea policy, has engaged in diplomacy for several months with Pak Song Il, a senior diplomat at Pyongyang’s UN mission, on the deteriorating relations and the issue of Americans imprisoned in North Korea.

But Daniel Russel, the former top US diplomat for East Asia until April, said this so-called New York channel had been a relatively commonplace means of communication with North Korea over the years, and it was not a forum for negotiation.

“It’s never been a vehicle for negotiations and this doesn’t constitute substantive US-DPRK dialogue,” he said, using the acronym for North Korea’s formal name, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

The annual joint US-South Korean military exercise, called Ulchi-Freedom Guardian, is expected to proceed as scheduled starting on August 21, said Lieutenant Colonel Christopher Logan, a Pentagon spokesman.

Trump’s latest comments were a continuation of days of incendiary rhetoric, including his warning on Tuesday that the United States would unleash “fire and fury” on Pyongyang if it threatened the United States.

Amid the heated words, South Koreans are buying more ready-to-eat meals that could be used in an emergency and the government is going to expand nationwide civil defense drills planned for August 23. Hundreds of thousands of troops and huge arsenals are arrayed on both sides of the tense demilitarised zone between the two Koreas.

BRAIN-IN-HEAD DRAW IMAGE www.crimefiles.net

Recently, in an airport in Kuala Lumpur, two women approached Kim Jong Nam—estranged half-brother of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un—from behind. They swiped what the victim described to nearby customer service agents as a “wet cloth” across his face, and fled. Shortly after, he was dead.

Now, Malaysian authorities say they’ve identified the substance that took Jong Nam’s life: VX, a nerve agent that the United Nations classifies as a weapon of mass destruction. And while it’s not an entirely uncommon substance—or particularly difficult to produce—its apparent use marks a troubling break from international norms. And if officials manage to link it back to North Korea, it could have serious consequences.

Special VX

If you’re already familiar with VX agent, it’s likely because of seminal 90s action flick The Rock, in which a disgruntled Ed Harris brings over a dozen VX-laden warheads along with him to seize Alcatraz.

VX doesn’t work quite the way The Rock depicts it. Specifically, contact with it doesn’t cause human skin to bubble and sear. But it plays havoc with the human nervous system. Like other nerve agents, VX interferes with the signals that pass between your brain and your muscles. “If you have a nerve impulse that tells a muscle to contract, you have to turn off the impulse. Otherwise the muscle will stay contracted,” says Matthew Meselson, a geneticist at Harvard and member of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation national advisory board. “The one that primarily kills is a spasm of the diaphragm, so you can’t breathe. You die of asphyxiation.”

VX can work through skin contact or respiration, and while it’s part of a broader class of nerve agents that all accomplish roughly the same effect, experts consider it to be especially dangerous, even among banned substances. “It’s heavier than other nerve agents, so it settles on an environment and can be persistent on the ground. If it was used in larger quantities, it could make an area non-usable,” says Tom Inglesby, director of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

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As the Kim Jong-nam incident showed, though, smaller quantities are also dangerous. “Even a tiny drop is lethal,” Inglesby says.

And while an antidote exists—atropine, which unlocks the muscles that VX causes to seize up—the nerve agent works so quickly that it’s no use unless there’s a hypodermic needle on scene.

So dangerous is the stuff, in fact, that all but a handful of countries agreed to destroy whatever stockpiles they had of VX as part of the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993. One of the handful of holdouts: North Korea.

The Red Line

In 1995, Japan’s Aum Shinrikyo cult turned the nerve agent on a small number of its members, whom leaders believed to be police informants. On a larger scale, VX was one of the chemical weapons deployed in the Iran-Iraq war. The Kim Jong Nam case, though, would be the first VX assassination on record, and the first time chemical weapons were used to that end since a ricin pellet—fired from an umbrella gun—took Bulgarian dissident Georgi Markov’s life in 1978.

“That this particular chemical weapon would be used in a political assassination in a third country is very alarming. It’s a red line,” says Ingelsby. “It should be considered a new threshold that’s been crossed in terms of unconventional weapons.”

Those norms matter. After decades without any nation deploying chemical weapons, Syria used sarin and chlorine gas. If a nation-state such as North Korea uses VX once, they or other actors may well do it again.

‘It should be considered a new threshold that’s been crossed in terms of unconventional weapons.’ Dr. Tom Inglesby, Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security

That’s all conditional for a reason. While North Korea maintains a VX stockpile, and Kim Jong Un may well have considered his half-brother a threat to his rule, there’s no direct link between the VX airport incident and the hermit kingdom. And there may well never be, at least from the weapon of choice.

“It’s not very hard to produce, so it’s doubtful that the specific use can be chemical-traced back to North Korea,” says Sigmund Gartner, director of the Penn State School of International Affairs. Any decent organic chemist can make the stuff.

Meselson also says that it may not have been VX at all; if it was, it’s remarkable that the two women survived the attack as well.

All of which underscores how critical the next several days of investigation will be. If it turns out to be a random or untraceable act, it may at least prove to be an isolated incident. Should a direct link to North Korea exist, the world will find itself in potentially dangerous, uncharted waters.

“The political reaction should be very strong internationally, once all the facts are in,” says Ingelsby. “Responsible countries around the world should make it very clear that this kind of behavior is unacceptable.”

Unfortunately, that’s the thing about red lines. Once you cross them, there’s no going back.

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Malaysian police today said that a VX nerve agent was used to kill the estranged half-brother of North Korea’s leader in Malaysia last week. Here’s what we know about the death of Kim Jong Nam.

moments-before-Kim-Jong-Nam's-death image www.crimefiles.net
Moments before Kim Jong Nam’s death

Doan-Thi-Duong-grabbed-&-poisoned-Kim-Jong-Nam image www.crimefiles (1)

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Doan Thi Duong
Main attacker who grabbed & poisoned Kim Jong Nam
nerve-agent-action-diagram image www.crimefiles.net

The banned chemical weapon action above

Authorities have already detained a number of suspects in the case of Kim Jong Nam. See full graphic on the murder

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