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Archive for the ‘CHEMICAL & NERVE GAS’ Category

Syria attacks: Autopsies ‘confirm chemical weapons used’ by Dictator Assard on his own people.Look into the child’s eyes you cowards.

assard-of-syria image www.crimefiles.netA Syrian doctor treats a child following Tuesday's chemical attack in Khan Sheikhoun, Syria image www.crimefiles.net

The autopsies, conducted on three victims by Turkish doctors, provide the most concrete evidence to date for why more than 80 civilians – including about 30 children – were killed. The chemical used was most likely the deadly nerve agent sarin, the Turkish Health Ministry said.

“According to the preliminary results, the findings suggest that the patients were exposed to a chemical substance [Sarin],” the statement said.

Sarin is 20 times as deadly as cyanide. Within seconds of exposure noses run, tears form, mouths drool and vomit. If exposed to a high concentration, victim will convulse, become paralysed and die within 10 minutes.

Turkish Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag said that the World Health Organisation supervised the autopsies and that the results were sent to The Hague for further analysis.

Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Muallem rejected the findings from Turkey, denying the government had used chemical weapons in the past and maintained that it never would.

At least 86 people were killed in the attack on the Syrian north-western town of Khan Sheikhoun, according to a tally from the health department in rebel-held Idlib Province, the New York Times reports. But the toll may not include victims evacuated to Turkey for treatment who have since died.

WHO experts took part in autopsies on victims of the chemical attack in a hospital in Adana, Turkey image www.crimefile.net

Meanwhile, demonstrations have erupted in London, New York, Los Angeles and parts of the United States against US President Donald Trump’s order to fire 59 missiles at a Syrian airbase early on Friday morning following the chemical attack.

The Syrian army claimed nine civilians, including four children, were killed in Friday’s aerial assault which, according to the Pentagon, were aimed at planes, depots and air-defence systems at the Shayrat Airfield.

Destroyed aircraft shelters on the south-east side of the Shayrat air base in Syria, following US strikes image www.crimefiles.net

The field, between Damascus and Homs, was hit with Tomahawk missiles fired from the USS Porter and USS Ross, two destroyers in the Mediterranean.

A statement from the Syrian army command described the attack as an act of “blatant aggression”, saying it had made the United States “a partner” of Islamic State, the ex-Nusra Front and other “terrorist organisations”.

The office of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, meanwhile, has called the US missile strike against the air base in central Homs “reckless” and “irresponsible”, Associated Press reported.

Only hours after the attack, two war planes took off from the central Syrian airbase and carried out bombing raids nearby, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, targeting territory controlled by IS.

A Syrian military source told Agence France-Presse that Syria’s armed forces were warned about possible US military action hours before the strike and a number of airplanes were moved to other areas. US officials said Russia’s military in Syria were informed beforehand in order to avoid casualties, AFP said.

This is the first time the US has directly targeted Assad’s forces. The Obama administration threatened to attack after previous chemical attacks, but did not.

Burnt and damaged hangars after they were attacked by US Tomahawk missiles image www.crimefiles.net

From his his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida, Trump said his decision had been prompted in part by what he called failures by the world community to respond effectively to the Syrian civil war.

“Years of previous attempts at changing Assad’s behaviour have all failed, and failed very dramatically. As a result, the refugee crisis continues to deepen, and the region continues to destabilise, threatening the United States and its allies.”

A Syrian doctor treats a child following Tuesday's chemical attack in Khan Sheikhoun, Syria image www.crimefiles.net

But United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres appealed to parties involved in the Syrian conflict for calm to avoid adding to the suffering.

“Mindful of the risk of escalation, I appeal for restraint to avoid any acts that could deepen the suffering of the Syrian people,” he said.

President Donald Trump speaks at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach after the US fired a barrage of cruise missiles into Syria image www.crimefiles.net

The situation in Syria now “amounts to an international armed conflict” following the US missile strikes, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross.

“Any military operation by a state on the territory of another without the consent of the other amounts to an international armed conflict,” ICRC spokeswoman Iolanda Jaquemet said in Geneva.

The guided-missile destroyer USS Ross fires a Tomahawk land attack missile towards Syria image www.crimefiles.net

“So according to available information – the US attack on Syrian military infrastructure – the situation amounts to an international armed conflict.”

Russian President Vladi­mir Putin called for an immediate meeting of the UN Security Council and his spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, called the US missile strikes “violations of the norms of international law, and under a far-fetched pretext”.

US allies around the world expressed support, if sometimes cautiously, of Washington’s strikes on Syria.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the strikes sent “a vitally important message” that the world would not tolerate the use of chemical weapons. “The retribution has been proportionate and it has been swift,” he said. “We support the United States in that swift action.”

Britain, France and Japan all expressed support.

“The UK government fully supports the US action, which we believe was an appropriate response to the barbaric chemical weapons attack launched by the Syrian regime and is intended to deter further attacks,” a British government spokesman said.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau urged an investigation into who was responsible for the chemical attacks before the US strike, according to Canada’s Globe and Mail.

“There are continuing questions…that’s why I’m impressing on the United Nations Security Council to pass a strong resolution that allows the international community to determine first of all who was responsible for these attacks and how we will move forward,” he said.

Washington Post, Reuters, AP, with Tammy Mills

BRAIN-IN-HEAD DRAW IMAGE www.crimefiles.net

Recently, in an airport in Kuala Lumpur, two women approached Kim Jong Nam—estranged half-brother of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un—from behind. They swiped what the victim described to nearby customer service agents as a “wet cloth” across his face, and fled. Shortly after, he was dead.

Now, Malaysian authorities say they’ve identified the substance that took Jong Nam’s life: VX, a nerve agent that the United Nations classifies as a weapon of mass destruction. And while it’s not an entirely uncommon substance—or particularly difficult to produce—its apparent use marks a troubling break from international norms. And if officials manage to link it back to North Korea, it could have serious consequences.

Special VX

If you’re already familiar with VX agent, it’s likely because of seminal 90s action flick The Rock, in which a disgruntled Ed Harris brings over a dozen VX-laden warheads along with him to seize Alcatraz.

VX doesn’t work quite the way The Rock depicts it. Specifically, contact with it doesn’t cause human skin to bubble and sear. But it plays havoc with the human nervous system. Like other nerve agents, VX interferes with the signals that pass between your brain and your muscles. “If you have a nerve impulse that tells a muscle to contract, you have to turn off the impulse. Otherwise the muscle will stay contracted,” says Matthew Meselson, a geneticist at Harvard and member of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation national advisory board. “The one that primarily kills is a spasm of the diaphragm, so you can’t breathe. You die of asphyxiation.”

VX can work through skin contact or respiration, and while it’s part of a broader class of nerve agents that all accomplish roughly the same effect, experts consider it to be especially dangerous, even among banned substances. “It’s heavier than other nerve agents, so it settles on an environment and can be persistent on the ground. If it was used in larger quantities, it could make an area non-usable,” says Tom Inglesby, director of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

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As the Kim Jong-nam incident showed, though, smaller quantities are also dangerous. “Even a tiny drop is lethal,” Inglesby says.

And while an antidote exists—atropine, which unlocks the muscles that VX causes to seize up—the nerve agent works so quickly that it’s no use unless there’s a hypodermic needle on scene.

So dangerous is the stuff, in fact, that all but a handful of countries agreed to destroy whatever stockpiles they had of VX as part of the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993. One of the handful of holdouts: North Korea.

The Red Line

In 1995, Japan’s Aum Shinrikyo cult turned the nerve agent on a small number of its members, whom leaders believed to be police informants. On a larger scale, VX was one of the chemical weapons deployed in the Iran-Iraq war. The Kim Jong Nam case, though, would be the first VX assassination on record, and the first time chemical weapons were used to that end since a ricin pellet—fired from an umbrella gun—took Bulgarian dissident Georgi Markov’s life in 1978.

“That this particular chemical weapon would be used in a political assassination in a third country is very alarming. It’s a red line,” says Ingelsby. “It should be considered a new threshold that’s been crossed in terms of unconventional weapons.”

Those norms matter. After decades without any nation deploying chemical weapons, Syria used sarin and chlorine gas. If a nation-state such as North Korea uses VX once, they or other actors may well do it again.

‘It should be considered a new threshold that’s been crossed in terms of unconventional weapons.’ Dr. Tom Inglesby, Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security

That’s all conditional for a reason. While North Korea maintains a VX stockpile, and Kim Jong Un may well have considered his half-brother a threat to his rule, there’s no direct link between the VX airport incident and the hermit kingdom. And there may well never be, at least from the weapon of choice.

“It’s not very hard to produce, so it’s doubtful that the specific use can be chemical-traced back to North Korea,” says Sigmund Gartner, director of the Penn State School of International Affairs. Any decent organic chemist can make the stuff.

Meselson also says that it may not have been VX at all; if it was, it’s remarkable that the two women survived the attack as well.

All of which underscores how critical the next several days of investigation will be. If it turns out to be a random or untraceable act, it may at least prove to be an isolated incident. Should a direct link to North Korea exist, the world will find itself in potentially dangerous, uncharted waters.

“The political reaction should be very strong internationally, once all the facts are in,” says Ingelsby. “Responsible countries around the world should make it very clear that this kind of behavior is unacceptable.”

Unfortunately, that’s the thing about red lines. Once you cross them, there’s no going back.

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Malaysian police today said that a VX nerve agent was used to kill the estranged half-brother of North Korea’s leader in Malaysia last week. Here’s what we know about the death of Kim Jong Nam.

moments-before-Kim-Jong-Nam's-death image www.crimefiles.net
Moments before Kim Jong Nam’s death

Doan-Thi-Duong-grabbed-&-poisoned-Kim-Jong-Nam image www.crimefiles (1)

Doan-Thi-Duong-grabbed-&-poisoned-Kim-Jong-Nam image www.crimefiles (2)

Doan Thi Duong
Main attacker who grabbed & poisoned Kim Jong Nam
nerve-agent-action-diagram image www.crimefiles.net

The banned chemical weapon action above

Authorities have already detained a number of suspects in the case of Kim Jong Nam. See full graphic on the murder

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IT SEEMS OBLITERATE THE REGIME IN SYRIA THAT GASES ITS OWN PEOPLE

Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad to be tried as a mass murderer

Gas clue in Syria phone call,War clouds.

MURDEROUS REGIME THAT IS SYRIA DEPICTS HORRORS IN THESE VIDEOS & PICS

United States intelligence services overheard a Syrian official in ”panicked phone calls with the leader of a chemical weapons unit” after last week’s alleged chemical attack, Foreign Policy magazine has reported.

”An official at the Syrian Ministry of Defence exchanged panicked phone calls with leader of a chemical weapons unit, demanding answers for a nerve agent strike that killed more than 1000 people,” the report said.

”Those conversations were overheard by US intelligence services,” the magazine said on Tuesday. ”That is the major reason why American officials now say they’re certain that the attacks were the work of the Bashar al-Assad regime – and why the US military is likely to attack that regime in a matter of days.’

The body of a victim who was killed by what activists say was a chemical weapons attack and discovered on Friday, is seen in the Ain Tarma neighbourhood of Damascus

United Nations investigators in Syria on Tuesday embarked on a hunt from bomb craters to blood samples for evidence of chemical weapons, even as officials from the US and Britain said it was indisputable the agents had been used.

”The best evidence you can find is an actual weapon, even if it’s exploded or broken up,” said Ralf Trapp, a former adviser at the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

”If you find a weapon you can tell whether it was something that was designed to deliver a liquid, and you will have residual contamination.”

Video footage of victims posted on the internet is convincing to Dr Trapp. ”It’s [on] a scale where you cannot stage it,” he said.

Doctors Without Borders said three hospitals it supports in Damascus had treated about 3600 patients with neurotoxic symptoms in less than three hours on August 21, and that 355 died.

The Syrian regime, backed by Russia and Iran, has said rebels were behind the attacks.

”We all hear the drums of war around us,” Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Muallem said. ”If they want to attack Syria, I think that using the lie of chemical weapons is fake and not accurate, and I challenge them to show evidence.”

The UN’s inspection team includes nine OPCW investigators and three experts from the World Health Organisation. The OPCW is a multinational group established to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention, which went into force in 1997 and bans the development, stockpiling, transfer and use of chemical arms.

Longer-lasting byproducts of a nerve agent such as sarin can be found in soil, rubble or animal corpses, Dr Trapp said.

Sarin interferes with cholinesterase, an enzyme in the body that regulates the movement of muscles and glands. Victims can survive if treated quickly enough with antidotes.

Doctors Without Borders said staff at its hospitals in Damascus reported large numbers of patients arriving with symptoms including convulsions, excess saliva, pinpoint pupils, blurred vision and respiratory distress.

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The UN investigators may be able to test survivors for depressed levels of cholinesterase, Dr Trapp said. But to establish the precise agent responsible, blood would need to be sent out for testing.

History suggests a thorough analysis is needed before the US and its allies decide whether to take military action, said Matthew Meselson, co-director of the Harvard Sussex Program on Chemical and Biological Weapons.

While initial reports of Iraq’s deadly chemical attack on Kurds in Halabja in 1988 proved correct, US accusations in 1981 that Russia had supplied a chemical agent that communist forces in Vietnam and Laos dispersed over Thailand were false; the so-called ”yellow rain” turned out to be honeybee droppings.

”It’s essential that any head of state or government official who’s making momentous decisions on the basis of chemical analysis must talk not just with other political figures or subordinates, but with individuals who are deeply knowledgable about the science itself,” Professor Meselson said.

Bloomberg, AFP, Washington Post

Damascus, Syria (CNN) — Saying “there is no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons attack in Syria: the Syrian regime,” Vice President Joe Biden signaled Tuesday that the United States — with its allies — was ready to act.

“Those who use chemical weapons against defenseless men, women and children should and must be held accountable,” Biden said in a speech to the American Legion.

The vice president’s remarks echo those made by other U.S. officials in recent days, as well as many of the nation’s foremost allies.

Dead animals are seen at the Zamalka area, where activists say chemical weapons were used by forces loyal to President Bashar Al-Assad in the eastern suburbs of DamascusA man inspects bodies of victims found on Friday and were killed by what activists say was a chemical weapons attack, in the Ain Tarma neighbourhood of Damascus130827102208-01-syria-morgue-story-top

French President Francois Hollande said his administration was “ready to punish those who made the decision to gas these innocent people,” adding that “everything leads us to believe” that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s forces are responsible.

British Prime Minister David Cameron — who talked Tuesday with U.S. President Barack Obama — called lawmakers back from their summer vacations to consider a response to Syria, as the UK military prepares contingency plans.

 

And U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told the BBC on Tuesday that U.S. forces are “ready to go” if ordered to strike Syria by President Barack Obama.

“The options are there. The United States Department of Defense is ready to carry out those options,” Hagel said.

Western leaders were reacting to a growing consensus that the Syrian regime was responsible for an August 21 attack that killed more than 1,300 people, most of them dying from exposure to toxic gases, according to rebel officials. The opposition — which has said it’s been targeted by chemical weapons attacks in the past as well — backed up its latest allegations with gruesome video of rows of dead bodies, including women and children, with no visible wounds.

Opinion: For U.S., Syria is truly a problem from hell

Syrian officials, though, have steadfastly denied using chemical weapons in this or other cases.

Foreign Minister Walid Moallem said Tuesday that his government would never use such munitions against its own people, daring those who disagree to present evidence publicly.

He said rebel forces were to blame for security concerns near the suspected chemical sites, arguing that Western leaders are using the claims as an excuse to go after al-Assad’s regime.

“We all hear the drums of war,” Moallem said. “They want to attack Syria. I believe to use chemical weapons as a pretext is not a right.”

And if foreign powers do strike the Middle Eastern nation, its foreign minister said the government and its forces will fight back.

“Syria is not easy to swallow,” said Moallem. “We have the materials to defend ourselves. We will surprise others.”

U.N. inspectors in Syria, but what will they find?

The United Nations has sent inspectors to Syria to try to get to the bottom of the wildly conflicting accounts of chemical warfare.

The opposition says chemical payloads were among the ordnance fired into the rebel stronghold of Ghouta. The government, via state TV reports, claims that its forces came into contact with toxic gas Saturday in Jobar, on the edge of Damascus — blaming this on “terrorists,” the term it commonly uses for rebel fighters.

CNN could not independently confirm either account, including videos purported to show the aftermath of each.

U.S. considers military action in Syria

The case against Syria

Syria warns U.S. against attack

Missile strikes on Syria likely response to chemical attack

On Monday, U.N. inspectors visited the town of Moadamiyet al-Sham, despite a close call with snipers that left one of their vehicles damaged and an explosion nearby.

The inspectors had been expected Tuesday to head to Ghouta, but that trip was pushed back a day “in order to improve preparedness and safety for the team.”

Moallem blamed rebel forces for failing to guarantee the U.N. group’s safety and denying that its forces have delayed inspections by continually shelling Ghouta.

Video posted Tuesday to YouTube purported to show the area being shelled, though CNN could not verify this video’s authenticity.

Yet Biden reiterated the claim that Syrian forces were shelling the suspected chemical attack site. And U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said it may be too late for a valid inspection of what happened — saying “too much time has passed” and accusing al-Assad’s government of using the U.N. investigation “as a stalling tactic or a charade to hide behind.”

The United States, meanwhile, is conducting its own investigation: An intelligence report detailing evidence of the alleged attack could be released as early as Tuesday, a U.S. official told CNN. The report will include forensic evidence and intercepted communications among Syrian military commanders, according to the official.

The vice president said that beyond whatever inspectors do or do not find, common sense and the recent past point to one culprit.

“The Syrian regime are the only ones who have the weapons, have used chemical weapons multiple times in the past, have the means of delivering those weapons, have been determined to wipe out exactly the places that were attacked by chemical weapons,” he said Tuesday.

Russia leads international charge against strikes

The calls for a military response were not without opposition.

Russia is leading the charge internationally, with Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov having said there is no proof yet Syria’s government is behind last week’s chemical attack. His office compares the Western allegations against Syria to claims Iraq was hoarding weapons of mass destruction before the U.S. invasion in 2003 — allegations that fell apart once American troops began searching for them.

Intervening in Middle East turmoil: Mission impossible?

And Tuesday, Russia’s foreign ministry accused Washington of trying to “create artificial groundless excuses for military intervention.”

Syria’s wounded treated in Israel

Horrific video we must show you

Moscow bemoaned the U.S. postponement of a meeting that was scheduled for Wednesday in The Hague, where top diplomats from both countries had planned to discuss the war in Syria.

And Russia criticized the United States for, in its view, trying to bypass the U.N. Security Council to take action on the reported chemical attack.

Should anything be moved through the U.N. council, Russia — which has a permanent seat on it — could block it.

Still, that’s what former British Foreign Secretary David Owen urged world leaders to do before unleashing missiles or warplanes on Syrian targets.

Omran al-Zoubi, Syria’s information minister, on Tuesday challenged the United States to “present this proof to the rest of the world” — claiming that they are asking for trouble if they do not.

“If they don’t have proof or evidence, then how are they going to stand up to the American public opinion and to the world public opinion and explain why they are attacking Syria?” al-Zoubi told CNN from Damascus.

Some worldwide have expressed concern that intervening in Syria may provoke broader conflict in the Middle East or ensnare Western powers in another bloody conflict after years of warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Cameron said that he understands those concerns, vowing that any action would have to be “proportionate, … legal (and) would have to be specifically about deterring the use of chemical weapons.”

Still, he said it’s critically important that action be taken to show the international taboo against chemical weapons will not be tolerated.

“This is not about wars in the Middle East; this is not even about the Syrian conflict,” he said. “It’s about use of chemical weapons and making sure, as a world, we deter their use and we deter the appalling scenes we’ve all seen on our television screens.

Syria diplomacy: Why Jordan wants military meeting to be hush-hush

CNN’s Fred Pleitgen reported from Syria. CNN’s Hamdi Alkhshali reported from Atlanta and Jomana Karadsheh from Jordan. Michael Pearson wrote and reported from Atlanta. CNN’s Greg Botelho, Ben Brumfield, Boriana Milanova, Chris Lawrence, Jim Acosta, Josh Levs, Joe Sterling, Elise Labott, Jill Dougherty and Saskya Vandoorne also contributed to this report.

However the video below gives another side to the war mongering gas attack scenario by the Syrian regime. It highlights that the rebels supported by the USA were responsible for the attack.You be the judge.

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