Crime Files Network

www.crimefiles.net/info.

Archive for the ‘ARMED SERVICES’ Category

A NORTH Korean defector has revealed she saw 11 musicians “blown to bits” by anti-aircraft guns in a terrifying execution ordered by maniacal dictator Kim Jong-un.

Hee Yeon Lim, 26, the daughter of a high-ranking soldier from Pyongyang, fled to South Korea last year and has told of the horrors she witnessed while part of the secretive Kim regime’s inner circle.

Speaking with The Mirror, she described one occasion where she was pulled out of school by soldiers and forced to watch a group of musicians accused of making a pornographic video being slaughtered.

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s nuclear ambitions have shocked the world. Picture: Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP

Hee Yeon said she and her classmates were taken to a stadium at the city’s Military Academy where the hooded and gagged victims were tied to the end of anti-aircraft guns in front of some 10,000 spectators.

The escapee then recalled how the guns were fired one by one, saying: “The musicians just disappeared each time the guns were fired into them. Their bodies were blown to bits, totally destroyed, blood and bits flying everywhere.”

Afterwards, Hee Yeon said tanks moved in and ran over the pieces of the victims’ bodies.

She added: “The tracks of the tanks were run over the remains and blood repeatedly, over and over again and made to grind the remains, to smash them into the ground until there was nothing left.”

Left feeling “desperately ill” after the grim spectacle, she later decided to escape the country.

When her father, Colonel Wui Yeon Lim, 51, passed away, she and her family fled the hermit kingdom to China in 2015 before arriving in South Korea capital Seoul last year.

The family paid people smugglers to drive them across the border to China, before travelling on to South Korea via Laos.

And despite her family’s relative privilege, Hee Yeon said she witnessed many other “terrible things” in her home city of Pyongyang — including dictator Kim’s use of teenage sex slaves.

US President Donald Trump (left) has dubbed North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “Rocket Man”. Picture: AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

She said officials came to her school to pick out teen schoolgirls to work at the dictator’s homes.

The escapee said they would only choose the prettiest girls, who were taught to feed him caviar and massage his body. If they refused they would “disappear”, she said.

Hee Yeon — who has met the terrifying despot — also told how he would gorge on imported delicacies like caviar and Chinese “Bird’s Nest Soup” which can cost $3300 per kilo.

In 2016, a shock report estimated tyrant Kim had executed 340 people since coming to power in 2011.

Of those killed, nearly half were senior officers in his own government, military and the ruling Korean Worker’s Party.

The brutal punishments meted out for “crimes” including having a “bad attitude”, treachery and for one poor party member slouching in a meeting.

In his debut speech to the United Nations on Monday, US President Donald Trump threatened to “totally destroy North Korea” after referring to Kim as “Rocket Man”.

The Institute for National Security Strategy — a South Korean think tank — released “The misgoverning of Kim Jong-un’s five years in power” detailing how he uses executions to tighten his grip on power.

Earlier this year, the country’s top schools official was executed by firing squad after he exercised a “bad attitude” at the country’s Supreme People’s Assembly in June.

In May 2015, Kim had defence minister Hyon Yong-chol killed with an anti-aircraft gun at a military school in Pyongyang, in front of an audience which included his own family who were reportedly made to watch the slaughter.

Kim’s half-brother, Kim Jong-nam, was assassinated. Picture: AFP/Toshifumi Kitamura

Two years earlier, in 2013, Kim’s own uncle Jang Song-thaek was executed for trying to overthrow the government.

In February, South Korea’s spy agency claimed Kim brutally executed five senior officials with anti-aircraft guns because they made false reports which “enraged” him.

The National Intelligence Service made the claims in a private briefing to politicians just days after Kim’s estranged older half-brother Kim Jong-nam was poisoned in a suspected assassination believed to have been ordered by the dictator.

An investigation is ongoing but South Korea says it believes Kim Jong-un ordered the killing of his sibling on February 13 at Kuala Lumpur’s airport.

ooo

RUSSIA REBUKES TRUMP OVER NORTH KOREA

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said he is “extremely concerned” after President Donald Trump told the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday he was prepared to “totally destroy” North Korea.

Mr Lavrov said Russia, which shares a border with North Korea, believes negotiations and diplomacy are the only way to resolve a crisis over Pyongyang’s missile program.

“If you simply condemn and threaten, then we’re going to antagonise countries over whom we want to exert influence,” said Mr Lavrov.

Russia’s rebuke comes as Mr Trump hit out at former US secretary of state Hillary Clinton over Kim’s despotic regime, tweeting: “After allowing North Korea to research and build Nukes while Secretary of State (Bill C also), Crooked Hillary now criticizes.”

ghost sniper has reportedly killed three Islamic State commanders in Sirte, Libya image www.crimefiles.net

A ghost sniper has reportedly killed three Islamic State commanders in Sirte, Libya.

HE IS the mystery gunman credited with taking down three Islamic State leaders in just 10 days.

But it is not known who the Libyan sniper is, if they’re acting alone, or who they are operating under.

What is known is that rumours of an anti-IS sniper are running rife in the new IS “caliphate” of Sirte, sparking panic and fear among terror group members in the Libyan city.

The most recent sniper casualty was Abdullah Hamad Al-Ansari, an IS commander from the southern Libyan city of Obari, who was shot leaving a mosque on January 23.

Hamad Abdel Hady, a Sudanese national working for the newly-established Sharia court, was also taken down by a sniper’s bullet outside a hospital days earlier, The Libya Prospect reported.

Abu Mohammed Dernawi, who was killed on January 19 near his home in the city, was the second IS leader to be taken down.

Rumours continue to grow that a shooter is systematically targeting IS commanders one-by-one, according to UK newspaper The Telegraph.

However, none of the deaths have been officially confirmed and further information is difficult to verify.

According to local media reports, IS militants carried out a series of arrests and executions in a desperate bid to catch the sniper.

One witness told al-Wasat website: “A state of terror prevailed among the ISIL ranks after his death. They randomly shot in the air to scare inhabitants, while searching for the sniper.”

LIFE UNDER IS RULE

Sirte, claimed by IS more than a year ago, is the first such place to be governed by militants outside of the stronghold of Raqqa, Syria.

The city is strategic given its proximity to both Europe and oil bases.

Not only have radio stations stopped playing music here, but other forbidden things have either been confiscated, destroyed, or replaced as militants extend their influence across the region.

Floggings have taken place along with public beheadings, while IS billboards display propaganda across the city.

However, the hard line rule has reportedly not sat well with locals with speculation the sniper has gained some support among disgruntled locals.

mystery sniper-image www.crimefiles.net

Little is known about the identity surrounding the mystery sniper.

SNIPER IDENTITY

Little is known about the confirmed identity of the sniper, or even if it is indeed a man or woman, or a group of marksmen.

Some reports claim the sniper is a man and is a militiaman from the neighbouring city of Misrata.

Other rumours suggest the sniper “honed his skills in Libya’s uprising against Colonel Gaddafi”, according to The Telegraph.

Local reports claim the sniper could be an American special forces soldier or a Libyan hero who wants to free the city’s residents from IS repression.

ooo

hs-sig-red-on-white

Has a mysterious WW2 train been found and was it carrying tonnes of gold image www.crimefiles.net

Has a mysterious WW2 train been found and was it carrying tonnes of gold?

Warsaw: Two people in Poland say they have found a Nazi German train cloaked in mystery since it was rumoured to have gone missing near the end of World War II while carrying away gold, gems and guns ahead of advancing Soviet Red Army forces.

Local authorities in Poland’s south-western district of Walbrzych said they had been contacted by a law firm representing a Pole and a German who said they had located the train and were seeking 10 per cent of the value of the findings.

“Lawyers, the army, the police and the fire brigade are dealing with this,” Marika Tokarska, an official at the Walbrzych district council, said. “The area has never been excavated before and we don’t know what we might find.”

Sobibor train station in Poland in 2009. The Nazis killed at least 250,000 Jews at the Sobibor death camp during the Holocaust.image www.crimefiles.net
A view of the Sobibor train station in Poland in 2009. The Nazis killed at least 250,000 Jews at the Sobibor death camp during the Holocaust. Photo: ReutersLocal news reports said the train in question went missing in 1945, packed with loot from the-then eastern German city of Breslau, now called Wroclaw and part of Poland, as the Red Army closed in at the end of World War II.
Advertisement

One local media report said the train was armoured and belonged to the Wehrmacht (Nazi Germany’s military).

Radio Wroclaw cited local folklore as saying the train entered a tunnel near Ksiaz Castle in the mountainous Lower Silesian region and never emerged. According to that theory, the tunnel was later closed and its location long forgotten.

Other media said the train could have been carrying some 300 tonnes of gold.

According to Radio Wroclaw, the 150-metre-long train was carrying guns, “industrial equipment”, gems and other valuable treasure. Tokarska said she did not have any details on the location or the contents of the missing train.

Some sceptics say there is no evidence that it ever existed.

“A handful of people have already looked for the train, damaging the line in the process, but nothing was ever found,” Radio Wroclaw quoted Joanna Lamparska as saying, describing her as a connoisseur of the region’s history.

“But the legend has captured imaginations.”

Trains were indeed used to spirit Nazi loot back to Berlin as US-led Allied and Soviet forces surged towards the German capital from the west and the east in the winter and spring of 1945.

In the case of the so-called “Gold Train”, Nazi forces sent 24 freight carriages from Budapest towards Germany filled with family treasures including gold, silver and valuable paintings seized from Hungarian Jews and estimated to be worth up to $US200 million ($273 million).

That train was intercepted by US soldiers, who, according to a later US investigation, helped themselves to some of the loot.

Reuters
ooo

hs-sig-red-on-white

 

Deceived: Tracee Douglas believed she was engaged to US soldier 'Robert Sigfrid', but was instead being wooed by a Nigerian scammer.

Deceived: Tracee Douglas believed she was engaged to US soldier ‘Robert Sigfrid’, but was instead being wooed by a Nigerian scammer. Photo: Edwina Pickles

There is something about men in uniform — and perhaps women in uniform — that is appealing and romantic. Hundreds, or perhaps thousands of scammers take advantage of military attraction to separate unsuspecting targets from their money.

Here’s how they work: Con artists working out of Internet cafés — often in Africa — troll through dating sites, Facebook and other websites, striking up acquaintances with lonely people, usually women. They talk about the dangerous but important work they do in Afghanistan, Iraq or other distant locations. They confess their feelings of love for their targets. Then they ask the targets for money to pay for “leave requests,” “communication fees,” “transportation costs” or some other financial need. Thousands of targets actually send money — sometimes a lot of money. It’s gone forever.

The problem has gotten so bad that last year the Army Criminal Investigation Command sent out a press release to warn the public, which is reprinted below.

I frequently hear from people who have been targeted by these scams. Some of them get suspicious and dump the con artists; others fall for the ruse and lose money. Why, exactly do people fall for romance scams? I addressed this in a previous article:

Why we fall for romance scams

Over the next few days, Lovefraud will publish a series of these military romance scams so you can see what they look like. The audacity of the perpetrators is mind-blowing.

U.S. Army CID Pleads with Public, Warns Against Romance Scams

Female victims being cyber-robbed daily by thugs claiming to be U.S. servicemen

QUANTICO, Va. Nov 26, 2012 – Special Agents from the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command are once again warning internet users worldwide, to be extra vigilant and not to fall prey to internet scams or impersonation fraud – especially scams promising true love, but only end up breaking hearts and bank accounts.

According to Army CID Special Agents, CID continues to receive hundreds of reports from people worldwide, of various scams involving persons pretending to be U.S. Soldiers serving in Afghanistan or somewhere else in the world.  The victims are most often unsuspecting women, 30 to 55 years old, who think they are romantically involved on the internet with an American Soldier, when in fact they are being cyber-robbed by perpetrators thousands of miles away.

“We cannot stress enough that people need to stop sending money to persons they meet on the internet and claim to be in the U.S. military,” said Chris Grey, Army CID’s spokesman. “It is heartbreaking to hear these stories over and over again of people who have sent thousands of dollars to someone they have never met and sometimes have never even spoken to on the phone.”

The majority of the “romance scams,” as they have been dubbed, are being perpetrated on social media, dating-type websites where unsuspecting females are the main target.

The criminals are pretending to be U.S. servicemen, routinely serving in a combat zone.  The perpetrators will often take the true rank and name of a U.S. Soldier who is honorably serving his country somewhere in the world, marry that up with some photographs of a Soldier off the internet, and then build a false identity to begin prowling the internet for victims.

“We have even seen instances where the Soldier was killed in action and the crooks have used that hero’s identity to perpetrate their twisted scam,” said CID Special Agent Matthew Ivanjack, who has fielded hundreds of calls and emails from victims.

The scams often involve carefully worded romantic requests for money from the victim to purchase special laptop computers, international telephones, military leave papers, and transportation fees to be used by the fictitious “deployed Soldier” so their false relationship can continue.  The scams include asking the victim to send money, often thousands of dollars at a time, to a third party address.

Once victims are hooked, the criminals continue their ruse.

“We’ve even seen instances where the perpetrators are asking the victims for money to purchase “leave papers” from the Army, help pay for medical expenses from combat wounds or help pay for their flight home so they can leave the war zone,” said Grey.

These scams are outright theft and are a grave misrepresentation of the U.S. Army and the tremendous amount of support programs and mechanisms that exist for Soldiers today, especially those serving overseas, said Grey.

Along with the romance type scams, CID has been receiving complaints from citizens worldwide that they have been the victims of other types of scams – once again where a cyber crook is impersonating a U.S. servicemember.  One version usually involves the sale of a vehicle; where the servicemember claims to be living overseas and has to quickly sell their vehicle because they are being sent to another duty station.  After sending bogus information regarding the vehicle, the seller requests the buyer do a wire transfer to a third party to complete the purchase. When in reality, the entire exchange is a ruse for the crook to get the wire transfer and leave the buyer high and dry, with no vehicle.

ooo

Army CID is warning people once again to be very suspicious if they begin a relationship on the internet with someone claiming to be an American Soldier and within a matter of weeks, the alleged Soldier is asking for money, as well as their hand in marriage.

Many of these cases have a distinct pattern to them, explained Grey.

“These are not Soldiers, they are outright thieves. If someone asked you out on a first date and before they picked you up they asked you for $3,000 to fix their car to come get you, many people would find that very suspicious and certainly would not give them the money.  This is the same thing, except over the internet.” said Grey.

The perpetrators often tell the victims that their units do not have telephones or they are not allowed to make calls or they need money to “help keep the Army internet running.”  They often say they are widowers and raising a young child on their own to pull on the heartstrings of their victims.

“We’ve even seen where the criminals said that the Army won’t allow the Soldier to access their personal bank accounts or credit cards,” said Grey.

All lies, according to CID officials.

“These perpetrators, often from other countries, most notably from West African countries are good at what they do and quite familiar with American culture, but the claims about the Army and its regulations are ridiculous,” said Grey.

The Army reports that numerous very senior officers and enlisted Soldiers throughout the Army have had their identities stolen to be used in these scams.

To date, there have been no reports to Army CID indicating any U.S. service members have suffered any financial loss as a result of these attacks.  Photographs and actual names of U.S. service members have been the only thing utilized.  On the contrary, the victims have lost thousands. In one extreme example, a woman from New York took out a second mortgage on her home to get money to help her “Soldier.”  She lost more than $60,000.  More recently, a woman from Great Britain told CID officials she had sent more than $75,000 to the con artists.

“The criminals are preying on the emotions and patriotism of their victims,” added Grey.

The U.S. has established numerous task force organizations to deal with this and other growing issues; unfortunately, the people committing these scams are using untraceable email addresses on “Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail,” etc., routing accounts through numerous locations around the world, and utilizing pay-per-hour Internet cyber cafes, which often times maintain no accountability of use. The ability of law enforcement to identify these perpetrators is very limited, so individuals must stay on the alert and be personally responsible to protect themselves.

“Another critical issue is we don’t want victims who do not report this crime walking away and thinking that a U.S. serviceman has ripped them off when in fact that serviceman is honorably serving his country and often not even aware that his pictures or identity have been stolen,” said Grey.

What to look for:

  • DON’T EVER SEND MONEY! Be extremely suspicious if you are asked for money for transportation costs, communication fees or marriage processing and medical fees.
  • If you do start an internet-based relationship with someone, check them out, research what they are telling you with someone who would know, such as a current or former service member.
  • Be very suspicious if you never get to actually speak with the person on the phone or are told you cannot write or receive letters in the mail.  Servicemen and women serving overseas will often have an APO or FPO mailing address. Internet or not, service members always appreciate a letter in the mail.
  • Many of the negative claims made about the military and the supposed lack of support and services provided to troops overseas are far from reality – check the facts.
  • Be very suspicious if you are asked to send money or ship property to a third party or company. Often times the company exists, but has no idea or is not a part of the scam.
  • Be aware of common spelling, grammatical or language errors in the emails.

Where to go for help:

Report the theft to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) (FBI-NW3C Partnership).

Online: http://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx

Report the theft to the Federal Trade Commission. Your report helps law enforcement officials across the United States in their investigations.

ooo

hs-sig-red-on-white

Israelis took part in a mass prayer at the Western Wall for the three abducted teenagers in June 2014 image www.crimefiles.net

Prayers for abducted murdered teenagers-Justice at last

Israeli troops have killed two Palestinians blamed for abducting and killing three Israeli youths in the occupied West Bank in June, the Israeli military says.

Marwan Kawasme and Amar Abu Aysha, militants in their 30s from the Hebron area, were blamed for grabbing and shooting dead the Israeli teenagers near a Jewish settlement on June 12, an incident that spiralled into a seven-week war in Gaza.

Israel had spent months searching for the two men, and said they were found in a house in Hebron today.

Hebron residents said troops surrounded the house before dawn, and reported sounds of gunfire.

The forces were seeking to arrest Kawasme and Abu Aysha, but the two wanted men were killed when a firefight erupted, Israeli military spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Lerner said in a telephone briefing.

“We opened fire, they returned fire and they were killed in the exchange,” he said.

“We have visual confirmation for one. The second one, we have no visual confirmation, but the assumption is he was killed.”

Palestinian officials did not confirm the men were killed.

The two men were affiliated with the Hamas militant group which runs Gaza, and a group leader praised their deed in August, though other top officials denied any advance knowledge.

Israeli forces began West Bank sweeps and rounded up hundreds of suspected Hamas members after the three teenagers, Jewish seminary students Eyal Yifrach, 19, and 16-year-olds Gilad Shaer and Naftali Fraenkel, went missing.

Their bodies were found in June near Hebron. After initially denying involvement in the killings, Hamas last month acknowledged responsibility.

The arrest of several hundred Palestinians in house-to-house raids across the West Bank stoked hostilities with Hamas, which dominates the Gaza Strip.

On July 8, Israel launched an offensive after a surge of Palestinian rockets being fired from Gaza at Israeli towns and cities.

Gaza medical officials say 2,100 Palestinians, mostly civilians, were killed. Sixty-seven Israeli soldiers and six civilians in Israel were also killed.

Reuters

hs-sig-red-on-white

Subscribe to Crime Files Network