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Archive for September, 2012

 

 

HOPEFULLY STALIN CHURCHILL & ROOSEVELT ARE ROTTING IN HELL

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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/news-video/video-us-memos-shine-the-light-on-1940-katyn-massacre/article4535615/

Katyn massacre: USA & Britain kept

quiet about Stalin’s slaughter of Polish

officers  & elite,released records now

reveal.

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Where are the apologies &

compensation to the victims &

families of this massacre sanctioned

by the world world 11 allies????

A group of American and British POWs being held by the Germans, including Lt. Col. John H. Van Vliet Jr. and Capt. Donald B. Stewart, look over a mass grave where murdered Polish officers are buried, near Smolensk, Russia.

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The long-held suspicion is that President Franklin Delano

Roosevelt & Britains Winston Churchill didn’t want to anger

Josef Stalin, an ally whom the Americans were counting on to

defeat Germany and Japan during World War II. Ground zero

means nothing. Pathetic propaganda for support  when

encouraging a mass murder of innocent Polish civilians.

As the USA is punishing the perpertrators of that 911 attrocity,

then the USA, Russia & Britain need to be brought to account.

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WARSAW, Poland (AP) — The American POWs sent secret coded messages to Washington with news of a Soviet atrocity: In 1943 they saw rows of corpses in an advanced state of decay in the Katyn forest, on the western edge of Russia, proof that the killers could not have been the Nazis who had only recently occupied the area.

The testimony about the infamous massacre of Polish officers might have lessened the tragic fate that befell Poland under the Soviets, some scholars believe. Instead, it mysteriously vanished into the heart of American power. The long-held suspicion is that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt didn’t want to anger Josef Stalin, an ally whom the Americans were counting on to defeat Germany and Japan during World War II.

Documents released Monday and seen in advance by The Associated Press lend weight to the belief that suppression within the highest levels of the U.S. government helped cover up Soviet guilt in the killing of some 22,000 Polish officers and other prisoners in the Katyn forest and other locations in 1940.

The evidence is among about 1,000 pages of newly declassified documents that the United States National Archives released and is putting online. Ohio Rep. Marcy Kaptur, who helped lead a recent push for the release of the documents, called the effort’s success Monday a “momentous occasion” in an attempt to “make history whole.”

Historians who saw the material days before the official release describe it as important and shared some highlights with the AP. The most dramatic revelation so far is the evidence of the secret codes sent by the two American POWs — something historians were unaware of and which adds to evidence that the Roosevelt administration knew of the Soviet atrocity relatively early on.

The declassified documents also show the United States maintaining that it couldn’t conclusively determine guilt until a Russian admission in 1990 — a statement that looks improbable given the huge body of evidence of Soviet guilt that had already emerged decades earlier. Historians say the new material helps to flesh out the story of what the U.S. knew and when.

The Soviet secret police killed the 22,000 Poles with shots to the back of the head. Their aim was to eliminate a military and intellectual elite that would have put up stiff resistance to Soviet control. The men were among Poland’s most accomplished — officers and reserve officers who in their civilian lives worked as doctors, lawyers, teachers, or as other professionals. Their loss has proven an enduring wound to the Polish nation.

In the early years after the war, outrage by some American officials over the concealment inspired the creation of a special U.S. Congressional committee to investigate Katyn.

In a final report released in 1952, the committee declared there was no doubt of Soviet guilt, and called the massacre “one of the most barbarous international crimes in world history.” It found that Roosevelt’s administration suppressed public knowledge of the crime, but said it was out of military necessity. It also recommended the government bring charges against the Soviets at an international tribunal — something never acted upon.

Despite the committee’s strong conclusions, the White House maintained its silence on Katyn for decades, showing an unwillingness to focus on an issue that would have added to political tensions with the Soviets during the Cold War.
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The evidence is among about 1,000 pages of newly declassified documents that the United States National Archives released and is putting online. Ohio Rep. Marcy Kaptur, who helped lead a recent push for the release of the documents, called the effort’s success Monday a “momentous occasion” in an attempt to “make history whole.”

Historians who saw the material days before the official release describe it as important and shared some highlights with the AP. The most dramatic revelation so far is the evidence of the secret codes sent by the two American POWs — something historians were unaware of and which adds to evidence that the Roosevelt administration knew of the Soviet atrocity relatively early on.

The declassified documents also show the United States maintaining that it couldn’t conclusively determine guilt until a Russian admission in 1990 — a statement that looks improbable given the huge body of evidence of Soviet guilt that had already emerged decades earlier. Historians say the new material helps to flesh out the story of what the U.S. knew and when.

The Soviet secret police killed the 22,000 Poles with shots to the back of the head. Their aim was to eliminate a military and intellectual elite that would have put up stiff resistance to Soviet control. The men were among Poland’s most accomplished — officers and reserve officers who in their civilian lives worked as doctors, lawyers, teachers, or as other professionals. Their loss has proven an enduring wound to the Polish nation.

In the early years after the war, outrage by some American officials over the concealment inspired the creation of a special U.S. Congressional committee to investigate Katyn.

In a final report released in 1952, the committee declared there was no doubt of Soviet guilt, and called the massacre “one of the most barbarous international crimes in world history.” It found that Roosevelt’s administration suppressed public knowledge of the crime, but said it was out of military necessity. It also recommended the government bring charges against the Soviets at an international tribunal — something never acted upon.

Despite the committee’s strong conclusions, the White House maintained its silence on Katyn for decades, showing an unwillingness to focus on an issue that would have added to political tensions with the Soviets during the Cold War.
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IGNORANCE BY SMART PHONE USERS ATTRACT ID THIEVES & CREDIT CARD SCAMMERS

ARE YOU BEING DUPED BY SCAMMERS VIA YOUR SOCIAL NETWORK & MOBILE PHONE?

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MOBILE phones and social networking sites have become a new battleground for cyber criminals who are stealing passwords and personal information by taking advantage of people’s ignorance.

Some people are very good at protecting themselves from email fraud and spam but that is ”so five to seven years ago”, said a cyber security expert who warns that criminals have shifted their gaze to mobile and social networking fraud.

About 5.4 million people were victims of cyber crime in Australia in the past year, costing the country $1.65 billion in direct financial loss, says the cyber crime report for the internet security company Norton, released yesterday.

While 93 per cent of the 13,000 global survey respondents said they delete unsolicited emails and 89 per cent said they do not open suspicious attachments from people they do not know, the majority had no idea about new threats, Norton’s vice-president of Asia-Pacific operations, David Freer, said.

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”The good news is that people are more aware of email threats but that’s five to seven years ago,” he said. ”The bad news is that’s the old way of being attacked.”

He said cyber criminals have ”moved to where the people are” and are increasingly targeting mobile phone and social networking sites where users are less aware of the risks.

One in five Australian mobile users has received a text message from someone they don’t know requesting that they click on a link or dial an unknown number to retrieve a ”voicemail” and one third of social network users have been targeted by a cyber criminal.

Yet 51 per cent of social network users and 81 per cent of mobile phone users had no security settings. And most people had no idea what a virus or cyber attack would look like.

”Malware and viruses used to wreak obvious havoc on your computer,” a safety advocate for Norton, Marian Merritt, said.

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”You’d get a blue screen, or your computer would crash, alerting you to an infection. But cyber criminals’ methods have evolved. They want to avoid detection as long as possible … Nearly half of internet users believe that unless their computer crashes or malfunctions, they’re not 100 per cent sure they’ve fallen victim to any such attack.”

Common forms of new cyber crime are people hacking into social networking profiles, infecting a computer with a virus sent through a dodgy link shared on a social networking profile, or sending a text message to a mobile phone with a dangerous link or voicemail message.

The most valuable piece of information for a cyber criminal was the password, Mr Freer said, as well as personal information that can be used to commit identity fraud.

The assistant commissioner of NSW Fair Trading, Rob Vellar, said instances of fraud increase when the economy worsens. In the past two years, fraud in NSW has risen by 5 per cent.

The average cyber crime victim lost $200, costing the population more than $1.65 billion in the past year.
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