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Walking through the streets of Neutral Bay on Sydney’s north shore, a humble and unassuming woman on the way to the convenience store she ran gave no hint of a darker side.

But inside her Yeo Street apartment, and in the presence of organised crime figures she did business for, Ping He assumed the role of the “godmother”.

This petite 52-year-old mother was at the helm of a lucrative money laundering ring, washing hundreds of thousands of dollars of drug proceeds offshore.

Her arrest was a major scalp in a lengthy NSW Organised Crime Squad investigation that shone a light on the scale of the illicit money laundering industry in Australia.

The intricacies of this investigation can now be detailed after He pleaded guilty last month to one outstanding charge.

Detectives put He – also known as “Angel” – – under surveillance in 2014 after learning of her extensive links to Asian organised crime figures.

He, who owned Danny’s Convenience Store in Neutral Bay, was part of a syndicate that laundered money from Australia to China and back again. Some of it would end up in the hands of Sydney-based Chinese nationals with gambling habits, court documents show.

The end game was to launder the proceeds of drug sales through numerous transactions with remitting agencies to mask the true source so it eventually appeared the money was from a legitimate source.

James Zhu, 48, who has been sentenced to five years jail from drug and money laundering offencesPhoto: NSW Police

Sometimes He, who charged maybe 1-2 per cent commission, would organise someone to travel to Melbourne with loads of cash to flush money through remitting agencies over the border.

The players in her syndicate referred to each other by titles like “Big head”, “team leader” and “godmother”.

In August, 2014, a surveillance device in He’s unit recorded convicted drug supplier James Zhu, 48, and another man counting $300,000 on a cash counting machine.

“I’m going to take my commission first, f**k how much should it be?” asked Zhu, who referred to himself as “the master”.

“$300,00, 2 per cent, $6000…do I take $6000?”

He replied: “Right, fine you take $6000, mine is $9000.”

A few days later, He was heard telling a courier how to split $250,000 into $50,000 lots and deposit it into one bank account via multiple remitters.

In May 2014, He used a remitter to move client He Ren’s drug sale proceeds from China to Australia. That money was directed to Chinese nationals in Australia who had deposited funds in He’s Chinese bank account.

“This transaction … showed the accused was using Ren’s drug-related funds to facilitate money transfers to other people who required funds moved from China to Australia for their own purpose,” a fact sheet tendered in court states.

He was also heard discussing drug prices with 52-year-old Ren, using terms like apples and oranges as code for ounces of methamphetamine.

Fearing Ren was on the police radar, Zhu urged He to stay away from him.

“Did you know how Ren made so much money,” Zhu told He in 2014.

“In the past it was me giving Ren f**king opportunities all the way along.”

Sweeping police raids resulted in the trio’s arrest and a swathe of charges.

He – the leader of the syndicate – was sentenced last month to five years’ jail, with a non-parole period of three years, for dealing with proceeds of crime.

She is due to be sentenced for participating in a criminal group charge in November.

www.money-au.com

Michelle Carter arrives at court in Taunton, MA on June 16, 2017 to hear the verdict in her trial.MURDER BY TEXT CASE.

John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

A Massachusetts judge has found 20-year-old Michelle Carter guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the 2014 suicide of her boyfriend, Conrad Roy III, who Carter repeatedly encouraged to commit suicide via text message. The American Civil Liberties Union has condemned the ruling, arguing it “imperils free speech” and could set a new precedent that chills people’s First Amendment rights when communicating via tech tools like text and social media.

But legal experts say Carter’s crime isn’t altogether new, and that it has little to do with texts. It’s based on a long history of legal precedent laying out when speech can be considered a crime and what role the law believes one individual can play in causing another’s suicide. Given that history, the fact that Carter’s communication with her boyfriend happened to play out over hundreds of text messages is almost irrelevant, and shouldn’t have much bearing on what people can and can’t say via smartphone.

“This story is news because it involves technology, but people have been using words to commit crimes as long as there have been crimes,” says Neil Richards, a professor at Washington University Law School, who specializes in speech and constitutional law. “People commit crimes with words, and now people use tech to communicate words, so now people are using tech to commit crimes with words.”

Joseph Cataldo, an attorney for Carter, told CNN’s Jake Tapper that Carter’s messages are protected speech. “These text messages Michelle Carter sent to Conrad Roy are speech. There’s no action,” Cataldo said. “He took his own life. He took all the actions necessary to cause his own death.”

And yet, according to Danielle Citron, author of the book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace, there are 21 crimes that have to do explicitly with speech—things like threats, extortion, aiding and abetting, and conspiracy. None of these types of speech are protected by the First Amendment. “If the First Amendment’s a house, where inside speech is protected, threats can’t walk in the door. Neither can extortion. Neither can solicitation of a crime,” Citron says. In other words, not all speech is covered by the First Amendment’s proverbial roof.

The details of Carter’s case, of course, have as much to do with criminal law as they do First Amendment law. On July 12, 2014, Roy affixed a water pump to his truck in a Kmart parking lot in an attempt to poison himself with carbon monoxide. He and Carter had already exchanged hundreds of texts in which she aggressively encouraged him to kill himself and even suggested the means by which he should do it. But those texts alone aren’t what landed Carter a guilty verdict. Instead, the prosecution argued that when Roy began to feel the effects of the carbon monoxide poisoning and stepped out of his car, Carter was the one who instructed him, via phone call, to “get back in.” And that, Judge Lawrence Moniz said in his decision Friday, was the moment Carter assumed responsibility for Roy’s life and engaged in “wanton and reckless behavior,” knowing it could cause Roy “substantial harm.”

“He breaks that chain of self-causation by exiting the vehicle,” Judge Moniz said. “He takes himself out of that toxic environment that it has become.”

The concept of the causal chain in suicide cases is one that courts have grappled with for decades, says David Gray, who teaches criminal law at University of Maryland’s Francis King Carey School of Law. The most famous defendant in such a case was, perhaps, Dr. Jack Kevorkian, who was tried for murder for allowing terminally ill patients to use his “suicide machine” to kill themselves. Kevorkian was ultimately acquitted because the judge ruled that, although Kevorkian provided his patients with the means to kill themselves, he didn’t actively participate in the “final overt act that causes death.”

“Kevorkian gave them the tools. He may well have wanted it, and believed it was the best thing for them,” says Gray. “But ultimately, they made the final choice. That act broke the causal chain.”

It wasn’t until Kevorkian was actually filmed injecting a patient that he was finally found guilty and sentenced to jail time. At face value, that looks like an argument in Carter’s favor. She was, after all, miles from the scene of Roy’s death when it happened. But Gray says that there are exceptions when the court decides that the person who commits suicide is compromised and not acting as “a free-willed agent.”

“That’s where this case seems to lie,” Gray says. “This young man was very troubled, very vulnerable, and the defendant exploited that vulnerability, expanded that vulnerability, and substituted her agency for his agency by constantly encouraging him to commit suicide.”

Carter also texted a friend following the suicide, saying, “I helped ease him into it and told him it was okay, I was talking to him on the phone when he did it … I could have easily stopped him or called the police but I didn’t.” That, Gray says, establishes “consciousness of guilt.”

“She knew he wasn’t in a position to make free choices for himself,” Gray explains.

But while the case may not set new precedents around digital speech, the fact that it was brought as an involuntary manslaughter case is noteworthy, says Richards. In the past, courts have often tried to apply tech-specific law to such cases. In 2006, for instance, a woman named Lori Drew created a fake Myspace account to communicate with a teenage girl named Megan Meier, who Drew believed was spreading rumors about her daughter online. Drew posed as a 16-year-old boy named Josh Evans and used it to encourage Meier to kill herself, which she eventually did. But instead of being charged with involuntary manslaughter, Drew was charged with (and later acquitted of) violating Myspace’s terms of service, in violation of the 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

“The knee-jerk reaction has always been: Something bad is happening using technology. We ought to pass a law about that use of technology,” Richards says. But the Carter case suggests that courts are beginning to look past the use of technology and see the crime for what it is.

And that means those digital crimes come with severe real life consequences. Carter, who will be sentenced on August 3, faces up to 20 years in prison.

www.club-libido.com

Kabul: A massive blast tore through the diplomatic quarter of the Afghan capital on Wednesday morning, killing at least 90 people and wounding more than 450, officials said. The devastation left Kabul in shock and underlined the country’s security struggles as it confronts a sustained wave of insurgent and terrorist attacks.

The suicide truck bomb hit the outside of the highly secure diplomatic area of Kabul killing scores of people. Photo: AP

Interior Ministry officials said a huge quantity of explosives, hidden in a water tanker, detonated at 8.30am during rush hour on a busy boulevard in the Wazir Akbar Khan district, which houses embassies, banks, supermarkets and government ministries. An entire city block was ravaged, with office buildings left in rubble and charred vehicles strewn across the road in one of the deadliest single attacks in Kabul.

The scenes of human horror were appalling, even for a country accustomed to war and violence.

At Wazir Akbar Khan Hospital, a steady stream of ambulances and police trucks delivered burned and mangled bodies, many streaming blood. Medical aides struggled to zip them quickly into body bags as distraught people crowded around, looking for missing relatives.

“I felt like it was an earthquake, and after that I do not know what happened,” said Mohammed Hassan, 21, who was attending a training program at the Azizi Bank, half a block from the blast, and suffered cuts on his head and arms. “All the staff around me, everyone, was injured.” He said he was brought to the hospital by an Afghan army ranger truck.

The Australian Embassy in Kabul was put into lockdown. News of the blast quickly reached Parliament House in Canberra, where the secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Frances Adamson, rushed out of a Senate estimates hearing to be briefed on the incident.

Australia does not make public the location of its embassy in Kabul for security reasons. Ms Adamson returned to the estimates hearing and said Australia’s diplomatic mission was in lockdown but she believed all staff were safe.

“It was a car bomb near the German embassy, but there are several other important compounds and offices near there too. It is hard to say what the exact target is,” Basir Mujahid, a spokesman for Kabul police, said.

The dead and wounded were almost all Afghan civilians and security forces: policemen, bank clerks, cart pullers, telephone company workers. The dead included at least five women and an Afghan driver for the BBC.

Although many foreign offices are located nearby – many surrounded by high blast walls – there were no reports of foreigners among the casualties. But some workers in diplomatic compounds, including those of Japan and Germany, were among the injured

At least 11 US citizens working as contractors also were injured, a State Department spokesman said.

The Afghan Taliban denied any role in the bombing, which was followed by a second smaller blast in another part of the city. The Taliban spokesman, Zabiullah Mujahid, did not speculate on which group could have carried out the attack but said it should “become clear at a later stage.”

Security agencies had warned that both Taliban insurgents and regional affiliates of the Islamic State were planning to attack high-profile targets in the city in the early part of Ramadan, the Muslim holy month that began last week.

Many injured survivors were cut by shards of glass from storefronts, offices and foreign compounds – as far away as several miles from the blast site. By midmorning, many were limping or being wheeled out of local hospitals, with their clothes covered in blood and their heads, arms or feet wrapped in bandages.

Nearby, distraught families squatted around bloody body bags, guarding them in patches of shade.

There were muffled, choking sounds of men weeping. Most of the dead had been seared by the blast; some were wrapped in cloth but others were half-naked and dripping blood. The Afghan ministry of Public Health placed the death toll at 80 and the injury count at 463.

“What will I tell his children?” a sobbing man said into a cellphone as he knelt beside a bag containing the remains of his brother, a guard in a building near the explosion.

“Look, that one is a woman. Shame, shame,” said an elderly man, pointing to a stretcher with a slender body wrapped in cloth, and a hank of long hair dangling outside.

The government of President Ashraf Ghani issued a statement condemning the twin blasts as “heinous acts that go against the values of humanity as well values of peaceful Afghans.” It also said the attacks “demonstrate the extreme level of atrocity by terrorists against innocent civilians.”

A statement from NATO forces in Afghanistan praised “the courage of Afghan Security Forces, especially the police and first responders.”

“Attacks such as these only serve to strengthen our commitment to our Afghan partners as they seek a peaceful, stable future for their country,” the NATO statement added.

Public anger at the Afghan government built in the traumatic hours after the blast. People with grim, dazed faces strode along the sidewalks, avoiding piles of glass, or sat glumly in modern offices with all their windows gone, watching the news on TV.

“This is an inept government that cannot protect the people and must be dissolved. It is time for an interim government to be formed,” said Mirwais Yasini, a member of parliament.

The Ghani government, weakened by internal tensions, has faced an uphill battle to fend off an aggressive push by Taliban insurgents in recent months, as well as a number of assaults claimed by the Islamic State.

Others expressed disgust for the attackers, especially since they chose Ramadan, a period that Muslims devote to prayer and fasting.

“How can the people who did this call themselves Muslims?” demanded Ahmed Mohibzada, 24, an office worker who had walked to the Wazir Akbar Khan Hospital to donate blood after hearing of the massive number of injured survivors.

He was lying on a gurney in the hospital porch with his sleeve rolled up. “I just felt I had to do something,” he said.

Washington Post, James Mackenzie, Mirwais Harooni

A drug addict who bludgeoned his mother and a young relative to death as they attempted to escape his ice-fuelled rage has been jailed for at least 30 years.

Dressed in prison greens, Lance Rhodes, 36, did not appear to react as he was handed a maximum of 40 years in jail in the NSW Supreme Court on Friday.

He continued to stab her as she lay helpless on the ground. Rhodes then picked up a 28-kilogram concrete statue and repeatedly hit her on the head with it, smashing her skull.

Rhodes returned to the home, grabbed a young child relative by the neck of his shirt and stabbed him in the chest before bashing his head against a wall.

Justice Stephen Campbell said Rhodes was in the grip of an “ice-induced psychosis” when the “terrible events” of September 8, 2015 unfolded.

After consuming a cocktail of substances, Rhodes stabbed his mother Linda Adams, 63, in the back as she tried to run away from him after he grabbed a large knife from the kitchen of the Lalor Park home they shared.

The boy managed to escape, but Rhodes caught up with him outside and bludgeoned him to death with a stone.

“Die, just fucking die, I don’t care,” Rhodes was heard to say.

Covered in blood, Rhodes attempted to attack another woman, Annabelle Saludo , by getting into her car. He hit the windows, yelled “F—ing open up” and then ran after the car and tried to lift it as the woman attempted to escape.

When Senior Constable Steve Lewis arrived, Rhodes picked up a water meter cover and walked towards him, saying, “Let’s go”.

Ms Adams’ body was found only two metres from the front door of her neighbour’s home. The boy’s body was found near a tree in the yard of the home he had fled.

Justice Campbell said “doubtless this offending would never have occurred” but for Rhodes’ self-induced intoxication

.The child, who can not be named for legal reasons, who was killed.

The court heard that shortly before the killings, Rhodes had returned to his home and said, “We’re going to have some fun tonight”.

“They are in the house … they are in the house … don’t worry I’ll get rid of them,” he was later heard saying.

While Justice Campbell accepted that the attack commenced “impulsively”, he said Rhodes had persisted with it and it was “accompanied by determination”.

The court heard Rhodes had a troubled childhood and started using cannabis when he was a teenager before moving onto heroin, speed and ice.

Before the double murder, he had been consuming ice for nine months.

Rhodes told police he could not remember killing his mother and the child and repeatedly said he was unwell.

“I know I clicked it. I’m insane. I need real professional help,” Rhodes told police in an interview. “I was in a different world.

“Everything was spacey. It was like being in a dark cloud.”

A drug addict who bludgeoned his mother and a young relative to death as they attempted to escape his ice-fuelled rage has been jailed for at least 30 years.

Dressed in prison greens, Lance Rhodes, 36, did not appear to react as he was handed a maximum of 40 years in jail in the NSW Supreme Court on Friday.

In a lengthy on-air monologue, TODAY host Karl Stefanovic attacked the Daily Mail for its coverage of women on the program.

Justice Stephen Campbell said Rhodes was in the grip of an “ice-induced psychosis” when the “terrible events” of September 8, 2015 unfolded.

After consuming a cocktail of substances, Rhodes stabbed his mother Linda Adams, 63, in the back as she tried to run away from him after he grabbed a large knife from the kitchen of the Lalor Park home they shared.

He continued to stab her as she lay helpless on the ground. Rhodes then picked up a 28-kilogram concrete statue and repeatedly hit her on the head with it, smashing her skull.

Rhodes returned to the home, grabbed a young child relative by the neck of his shirt and stabbed him in the chest before bashing his head against a wall.

Lance Rhodes at the crime scene, on the night he was arrested.

Lance Rhodes at the crime scene, on the night he was arrestedPhoto: TNV

Covered in blood, Rhodes attempted to attack another woman, Annabelle Saludo , by getting into her car. He hit the windows, yelled “F—ing open up” and then ran after the car and tried to lift it as the woman attempted to escape.

When Senior Constable Steve Lewis arrived, Rhodes picked up a water meter cover and walked towards him, saying, “Let’s go”.

Ms Adams’ body was found only two metres from the front door of her neighbour’s home. The boy’s body was found near a tree in the yard of the home he had fled.

Justice Campbell said “doubtless this offending would never have occurred” but for Rhodes’ self-induced intoxication.

The court heard that shortly before the killings, Rhodes had returned to his home and said, “We’re going to have some fun tonight”.

“They are in the house … they are in the house … don’t worry I’ll get rid of them,” he was later heard saying.

While Justice Campbell accepted that the attack commenced “impulsively”, he said Rhodes had persisted with it and it was “accompanied by determination”.

The court heard Rhodes had a troubled childhood and started using cannabis when he was a teenager before moving onto heroin, speed and ice.

Before the double murder, he had been consuming ice for nine months.

Rhodes told police he could not remember killing his mother and the child and repeatedly said he was unwell.

“I know I clicked it. I’m insane. I need real professional help,” Rhodes told police in an interview. “I was in a different world.

“Everything was spacey. It was like being in a dark cloud.”

But Justice Campbell was sceptical that Rhodes had no memory of the events, saying his repeated concern to present himself as a paranoid schizophrenic was an attempt to provide justification for his behaviour.

Outside court, Ms Adams’ daughter Tina Rhodes said she loved her mother and the child.

“No matter how long the sentence is, it will not bring back two beautiful people we have lost,” she said.

Rhodes will be eligible for parole in 2045.

www.druglinks.info

Australian Taxation Office Deputy Commissioner Michael Cranston will be charged in connection with an alleged $165 million tax fraud syndicate following what police have described as one of the biggest white collar fraud investigations in Australian history.

Mr Cranston has been issued a future court attendance notice for the charge of abusing his position as a public official. He is due to appear in Sydney’s Central Local Court on June 13.

His son, Adam Cranston, 30, and his daughter, Lauren Anne Cranston, 24, have also been charged following an eight-month investigation, codenamed Operation Elbrus.

World biggest scam of $165 million has engulfed most senior officers

 

It’s alleged Michael Cranston accessed restricted information on an ATO audit for his son, but police do not believe he knew about his son’s alleged fraud syndicate.

Australian Federal Police Deputy Commissioner Leanne Close said the syndicate appeared to use the money to fund a “lavish lifestyle”.

Among the items seized under proceeds of crime were 25 motor vehicles, including luxury cars and racing cars, 12 motorbikes, 18 residential properties, two aircraft, $1 million from a safe deposit box, firearms, jewellery, bottles of Grange wine and artworks.

ATO Second Commissioner Andrew Mills said two other ATO officers were also being investigated internally for potential code of conduct breaches. It’s believed they tried to look up information on the ATO’s audit at the behest of Michael Cranston.

The announcement came after nearly 300 police officers on Wednesday carried out raids across Sydney, Wollongong and the Southern Highlands, arresting nine people.

Adam Cranston, from Bondi, and Lauren Cranston, from Picton, are among six people alleged to be members of a tax fraud syndicate that netted $165 million.

One of the luxury cars seized by Australian Federal Police officers during Wednesday’s raids.

All six were charged with conspiracy to defraud the Commonwealth for their alleged role in the syndicate, while two men were charged with money laundering offences.

One was charged in relation to an alleged extortion on the syndicate, which also resulted in additional charges against two people charged in relation to the syndicate.

Among those who appeared in court on Thursday are Daniel Rostankovski, 28, from Waterloo; Jason Cornell Onley, 47, from Vaucluse; Daniel Hausman, 47, from Woollahra; Christopher James Guillan, 46, from Sutherland; Dev Menon, 33, from Wahroonga and Devyn Hammon, 24, from Balgownie.

Police will allege in court that the syndicate members ran a legitimate payroll company, Plutus Payroll, and accepted money from legitimate clients to process payroll on their behalf.

“This money was transferred to seven sub-contracted companies known as Tier 2 companies, which then made payroll payments to individual workers or clients,” the federal police said in a statement.

The directors of those Tier 2 companies were known as straw directors, police say, and were essentially a front for the syndicate members, who retained effective control.

“As part of their contractual obligations to the legitimate payroll company’s clients, the Tier 2 companies are required to remit pay as you go (PAYG) withholding tax payments to the ATO on behalf of the clients,” police said.

“However, investigators found that only part of these tax obligations were paid. The remaining money was allegedly siphoned off by the syndicate members and channelled through a complex series of companies and trusts for their own personal gain.”

Michael Cranston is due to appear in court on June 13. 

Tax Office investigators, who helped the federal police during the investigation, estimate the amount of tax obligations not paid to the Tax Office to be $165 million.

Mr Mills described Michael Cranston as one of the organisation’s “long-serving senior officers” who had “quite an illustrious [career] up until this point”.

Mr Mills said he was confident the Tax Office’s systems had not been compromised nor breached and the accused employees were not able to obtain any information.

“The investigation has so far not revealed any evidence of actual intervention or influence on audit cases, or of money being refunded, or of tax liability being changed,” Mr Mills said.

“The information I have to date shows no compromise of the operations of our administration. Our systems, controls and procedures worked effectively and we have been able to successfully isolate and protect the investigation, working well with the Australian Federal Police over many months to build a picture of what has been happening.”

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull congratulated the federal police for the investigation and “taking the action that they have”.

“We have zero tolerance – zero tolerance – for this type of conspiracy, this type of fraud, this type of abuse of public office,” he said.

“People who break our laws – whether it is endeavouring to defraud the Commonwealth and the tax system, whether it is planning terror plots, whether it’s trafficking in drugs – our police, our agencies, will catch them. Catch them, prosecute them and bring the full weight of the law down to bear on them.

“It is a credit to the police that the matter has been identified and charges have been laid. We are ever vigilant. You cannot be ever complacent about any aspect of integrity in public life or in government. So we have a relentless pursuit of corruption, malpractice, abuse of office. The AFP have a very keen focus on it, I can assure you, as has been demonstrated.”

Mr Turnbull described the alleged fraud as “very, very much to be regretted”, particularly the alleged involvement of a senior Tax Office official.

“Nobody should imagine that they can escape our law-enforcement agencies,” he said.

“We have zero tolerance for people who seek to defraud the Commonwealth of its revenue.

“As I said earlier, ideally we prefer taxes to be lower, but taxes must be paid. They are compulsory.”

www.scamsfakes.com

www.policesearch.net

www.money-au.com

A man accused of torturing, raping and detaining women he lived with over more than two decades has been found guilty of a raft of charges.

The 52-year-old’s trial heard allegations that he physically and psychologically abused a succession of women he lived with on the NSW Central Coast between 1988 and 2014.

A jury found the man guilty of 10 rape charges and eight count of detaining for advantage in the NSW District Court on Friday afternoon. But the jury have not yet reached a verdict on three other counts of indecent assault

The man’s trial heard that he beat, assaulted and degraded six women, and one of their children, telling one partner: “I own you. I am the king and you have to obey me.”

The man, who was a member of the Jehovah’s Witness Church, was accused of raping women with household objects, forcing them to eat their dinners off the floor, and hog-tying them and placing them face down in a bath filled with water.

The court heard he allegedly flew into violent rages if the washing was not folded correctly, an ex-boyfriend was mentioned or a sandwich was not to his liking.

One woman was forced to sleep in the laundry, shave her hair and to stay up all night.

“I’m your king. You are my slave you’re never going anywhere. You’ll never escape me,” he allegedly told another woman after raping her.

Another female partner gave evidence in court that the man pummelled her with a piece of wood when she was pregnant.

“Today’s my birthday … I want my son to be born on my birthday,” the man said.

The court heard that he threw bread knives at the woman and beat her unconscious after they bumped into her ex-boyfriend while at the RSL.

“I should have been your first boyfriend. You’re a slut. You should have told me you had someone else before me,” he allegedly said.

I’m your king. You are my slave you’re never going anywhere.

At one stage, the court heard, two of the man’s partners were living in the same house with him. He allegedly owned the only keys to the house, kept the door deadlocked and forbid the women from leaving the house together. He was also accused of forcing them to sexually touch each other.

Crown prosecutor Brett Hatfield told the court that the man forged relationships with young women over time and intended to “frighten such females and to render them powerless” so he could control and dominate them as he pleased.

www.club-libido.com

www.clublibido.com.au

www.mylove=au.com

 

Darrell Lance Abbott, best known as “Dimebag Darrell,” was the songwriter and guitarist of the metal band Pantera. During a on December 8, 2004 performance, former Marine Nathan Gale stormed the stage and fatally shot Dimebag Darrell. He killed three others.

 

Syria attacks: Autopsies ‘confirm chemical weapons used’ by Dictator Assard on his own people.Look into the child’s eyes you cowards.

assard-of-syria image www.crimefiles.netA Syrian doctor treats a child following Tuesday's chemical attack in Khan Sheikhoun, Syria image www.crimefiles.net

The autopsies, conducted on three victims by Turkish doctors, provide the most concrete evidence to date for why more than 80 civilians – including about 30 children – were killed. The chemical used was most likely the deadly nerve agent sarin, the Turkish Health Ministry said.

“According to the preliminary results, the findings suggest that the patients were exposed to a chemical substance [Sarin],” the statement said.

Sarin is 20 times as deadly as cyanide. Within seconds of exposure noses run, tears form, mouths drool and vomit. If exposed to a high concentration, victim will convulse, become paralysed and die within 10 minutes.

Turkish Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag said that the World Health Organisation supervised the autopsies and that the results were sent to The Hague for further analysis.

Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Muallem rejected the findings from Turkey, denying the government had used chemical weapons in the past and maintained that it never would.

At least 86 people were killed in the attack on the Syrian north-western town of Khan Sheikhoun, according to a tally from the health department in rebel-held Idlib Province, the New York Times reports. But the toll may not include victims evacuated to Turkey for treatment who have since died.

WHO experts took part in autopsies on victims of the chemical attack in a hospital in Adana, Turkey image www.crimefile.net

Meanwhile, demonstrations have erupted in London, New York, Los Angeles and parts of the United States against US President Donald Trump’s order to fire 59 missiles at a Syrian airbase early on Friday morning following the chemical attack.

The Syrian army claimed nine civilians, including four children, were killed in Friday’s aerial assault which, according to the Pentagon, were aimed at planes, depots and air-defence systems at the Shayrat Airfield.

Destroyed aircraft shelters on the south-east side of the Shayrat air base in Syria, following US strikes image www.crimefiles.net

The field, between Damascus and Homs, was hit with Tomahawk missiles fired from the USS Porter and USS Ross, two destroyers in the Mediterranean.

A statement from the Syrian army command described the attack as an act of “blatant aggression”, saying it had made the United States “a partner” of Islamic State, the ex-Nusra Front and other “terrorist organisations”.

The office of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, meanwhile, has called the US missile strike against the air base in central Homs “reckless” and “irresponsible”, Associated Press reported.

Only hours after the attack, two war planes took off from the central Syrian airbase and carried out bombing raids nearby, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, targeting territory controlled by IS.

A Syrian military source told Agence France-Presse that Syria’s armed forces were warned about possible US military action hours before the strike and a number of airplanes were moved to other areas. US officials said Russia’s military in Syria were informed beforehand in order to avoid casualties, AFP said.

This is the first time the US has directly targeted Assad’s forces. The Obama administration threatened to attack after previous chemical attacks, but did not.

Burnt and damaged hangars after they were attacked by US Tomahawk missiles image www.crimefiles.net

From his his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida, Trump said his decision had been prompted in part by what he called failures by the world community to respond effectively to the Syrian civil war.

“Years of previous attempts at changing Assad’s behaviour have all failed, and failed very dramatically. As a result, the refugee crisis continues to deepen, and the region continues to destabilise, threatening the United States and its allies.”

A Syrian doctor treats a child following Tuesday's chemical attack in Khan Sheikhoun, Syria image www.crimefiles.net

But United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres appealed to parties involved in the Syrian conflict for calm to avoid adding to the suffering.

“Mindful of the risk of escalation, I appeal for restraint to avoid any acts that could deepen the suffering of the Syrian people,” he said.

President Donald Trump speaks at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach after the US fired a barrage of cruise missiles into Syria image www.crimefiles.net

The situation in Syria now “amounts to an international armed conflict” following the US missile strikes, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross.

“Any military operation by a state on the territory of another without the consent of the other amounts to an international armed conflict,” ICRC spokeswoman Iolanda Jaquemet said in Geneva.

The guided-missile destroyer USS Ross fires a Tomahawk land attack missile towards Syria image www.crimefiles.net

“So according to available information – the US attack on Syrian military infrastructure – the situation amounts to an international armed conflict.”

Russian President Vladi­mir Putin called for an immediate meeting of the UN Security Council and his spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, called the US missile strikes “violations of the norms of international law, and under a far-fetched pretext”.

US allies around the world expressed support, if sometimes cautiously, of Washington’s strikes on Syria.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the strikes sent “a vitally important message” that the world would not tolerate the use of chemical weapons. “The retribution has been proportionate and it has been swift,” he said. “We support the United States in that swift action.”

Britain, France and Japan all expressed support.

“The UK government fully supports the US action, which we believe was an appropriate response to the barbaric chemical weapons attack launched by the Syrian regime and is intended to deter further attacks,” a British government spokesman said.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau urged an investigation into who was responsible for the chemical attacks before the US strike, according to Canada’s Globe and Mail.

“There are continuing questions…that’s why I’m impressing on the United Nations Security Council to pass a strong resolution that allows the international community to determine first of all who was responsible for these attacks and how we will move forward,” he said.

Washington Post, Reuters, AP, with Tammy Mills

swedens-truck-murders-scene image www.crimefiles.net

A truck ploughed into a crowd on a shopping street and crashed into a department store in central Stockholm on Friday, killing four people and wounding 15 in what the Swedish prime minister said appeared to be a terrorist attack.

Police said they had detained one person in a northern Stockholm suburb after earlier circulating a picture of a man wearing a grey hoodie in connection with the investigation into the attack on Drottninggatan (Queen Street) using a hijacked beer truck, which happened at around 2.45pm local time.

The scene shortly after a truck crashed into a department store in central Stockholm image www.crimefiles.net

Local authorities in the capital said early Saturday that six of the injured had been able to leave hospital while eight adults and one child remained hospitalised.

Swedish public broadcaster SVT reported police had detained a second man and that he had a connection to the previously arrested person, citing police sources. The police declined to comment on whether it had arrested any additional suspects.

Prosecutors ordered the man arrested on suspicion of terror crime through the act of murder. He was arrested on the highest level of suspicion in the Swedish legal system.

The man police had said was wanted in connection with a truck attack in central Stockholm image www.crimefiles.net

Jan Evensson of the Stockholm police said the man who was arrested looked like the person in the surveillance camera photo above.

An injured person is helped by passers-by sweden truck murders image www.crimefiles.net

“Our message will always be clear: you will not defeat us, you will not govern our lives, you will never, ever win,” Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, who had earlier described the assault as a terrorist attack, told a news conference.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

Aftonbladet, a daily newspaper, reported a man with light injuries had been arrested in north Stockholm after claiming he was responsible for carrying out the attack.

According to The Telegraph, London, reports indicated that the suspected attacker was a 39-year-old father-of-four from Uzbekistan.

Some reports suggested he had previously posted jihadist propaganda on his Facebook page and had images of people injured in the explosion at the Boston Marathon in April 2013.

A police spokesperson declined to comment on the information.

Police said security at Swedish borders had been heightened. They did not rule out the possibility other attackers were involved.

Aussie tourist: ‘I saw a big truck coming towards me’

“I turned around and saw a big truck coming towards me. It swerved from side to side. It didn’t look out of control. It was trying to hit people,” Glen Foran, an Australian tourist in his 40s, told Reuters.

“It hit people; it was terrible. It hit a pram with a kid in it, demolished it,” he said.

“It took a long time for police to get here. I suppose from their view it was quick, but it felt like forever.”

The area of the attack in central Stockholm was evacuated, including the main rail station, and remained cordoned off late on Friday. All subway traffic was halted on police orders and government offices were closed.

A Reuters witness at the scene saw police officers put what appeared to be two bodies into body bags.

Bloody tyre tracks showed the path of the truck, which was stolen by a masked hijacker while making a beer delivery to a tapas bar further up Drottninggatan, according to Spendrups Brewery spokesman Marten Lyth.

“We were standing by the traffic lights at Drottninggatan and then we heard some screaming and saw a truck coming,” a witness who declined to be named told Reuters.

“Then it drove into a pillar at (department store) Ahlens City, where the hood started burning. When it stopped we saw a man lying under the tyre. It was terrible to see,” said the man, who saw the incident from his car.

Police said four people had died and 15 were injured. National news agency TT said those hurt included the delivery driver, who had tried to stop the hijack.

Pretty cunning modus operandi

Several attacks in which trucks or cars have driven into crowds have taken place in Europe in the past year.

Al Qaeda in 2010 urged its followers to use trucks as a weapon. Islamic State claimed responsibility for an attack in Nice, France, last July, when a truck killed 86 people celebrating Bastille Day, and one in Berlin in December, when a truck smashed through a Christmas market, killing 12 people.

“Hijacking a truck, that has happened before,” Magnus Ranstorp, head of terrorism research at the Swedish Defence University, told Reuters.

“And this is a pretty cunning modus operandi. To drive to Ahlens and stop … There is a way down to the subway just a few metres away from there, and then you … can jump on any train you want and quickly disappear.”

Stockholmers opened up their homes and offered lifts to people who were unable to get home or needed a place to stay.

“Our thoughts are going out to those that were affected, and to their families,” Sweden’s King Carl Gustaf said in a statement, while European Union chief executive Jean-Claude Juncker said an attack on any of the bloc’s member states “is an attack on us all”.

The attack was the latest to hit the Nordic region after shootings in Danish capital Copenhagen in 2015 that killed three people and the 2011 bombing and shooting by far right extremist Anders Behring Breivik that killed 77 people in Norway.

Sweden has not seen a large-scale attack, although in December 2010 a failed suicide bombing killed the attacker only a few hundred yards from the site of Friday’s incident.

In February, US President Donald Trump falsely suggested there had been an immigration-related security incident in Sweden, to the bafflement of Swedes.

Swedish authorities raised the national security threat level to four on a scale of five in October 2010 but lowered the level to three, indicating a “raised threat”, in March 2016.

Police in Norway’s largest cities and at Oslo airport will carry weapons until further notice following the attack. Denmark has been on high alert since the February 2015 shootings. Traffic was restricted on the Oresund Bridge linking Denmark and Sweden at the request of Swedish police.

Neutral Sweden has not fought a war in more than 200 years, but its military has taken part in UN peacekeeping missions in a number of conflict zones in recent years, including Iraq, Mali and Afghanistan.

The Sapo security police said in its annual report it was impossible to say how big a risk there was that Sweden would be targeted like other European cities, but that, if so “it is most likely that it would be undertaken by a lone attacker”.

The Telegraph, London and Reuters

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A live-streamed trial for former Perth man Henri van Breda, charged with murdering his family with an axe, will appear in a South African court on Monday

The van Breda family image www.crimefiles.net

Teresa van Breda, 55, her husband Martin van Breda‚ 54‚ and their eldest son Rudi‚ 22, were found dead at their home on the De Zalze Golf Estate in January 2015.

Mr van Breda was found there with minor injuries alongside sister Marli, then 16, who survived massive head injuries and a severed jugular. She now has brain injuries retrograde amnesia but is reportedly on the list of more than 100 people to testify in the case.

Mr van Breda, 21, handed himself in to Stellenbosch Police station with his attorney in June. He was charged with three counts of murder, one of attempted murder and another of obstructing justice and was released on bail.

The case has attracted global attention, with the first appearance given rolling coverage from South Africa’s News 24 and other local outlets.

Australian media was also at the Western Cape High Court on on Monday, where Judge Siraj Desai has granted an application by Media24 to live-stream the trial, which will begin about 8.15pm Perth time.

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