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Congolese ex-rebel leader Jean-Pierre Bemba has been jailed for 18 years following a landmark conviction at the International Criminal Court (ICC) for war crimes and sexual violence.

Bemba, a former vice-president of DR Congo, was convicted in March of crimes committed in the neighbouring Central African Republic (CAR) in 2002-2003.

He was accused of failing to stop his rebels from killing and raping people.

Bemba’s lawyers have already said they will appeal against his conviction.

Judges announced sentences of between 16 and 18 years for five counts of rape, murder and pillaging, with the jail terms running concurrently. The eight years Bemba has already spent in custody will be deducted from his term.

His conviction was the first time the ICC had focused on rape as a weapon of war, and the first time a suspect had been convicted for crimes committed by others under his command.

Passing sentence at the ICC in The Hague, Judge Sylvia Steiner said Bemba had failed to exercise control over his private militia sent into CAR, where they carried out “sadistic” rapes, murders and pillaging of “particular cruelty”.

The BBC’s Anna Holligan, who is in The Hague, says two key issues remain – where Bemba will serve his sentence and the amount of compensation to be awarded to his victims.


Who is Jean-Pierre Bemba?

Jean-Pierre Bemba image www.crimefiles.net

  • A well-connected businessman and the son of prominent Congolese businessman Bemba Saolona
  • 1998: Helped by Uganda to form MLC rebel group in Democratic Republic of Congo
  • 2003: Becomes vice-president under peace deal
  • 2006: Loses run-off election to President Joseph Kabila but gets most votes in western DR Congo, including Kinshasa
  • 2007: Flees to Belgium after clashes in Kinshasa
  • 2008: Arrested in Brussels and handed over to ICC
  • 2010: Trial begins
  • 2016: Found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity

Profile: Jean-Pierre Bemba

More about DR Congo


Bemba was “extremely disappointed” with the sentence, his lawyer, Kate Gibson, told AFP news agency.

“Today’s sentence is by no means the end of the road for Mr Bemba, it merely signals that we are now moving to the next phase of the process which is the appeal,” she said.

In 2002 Bemba had sent more than 1,000 fighters to the CAR to help then president Ange Felix Patasse put down an attempted coup.

The court heard that his troops committed acts of extreme violence against civilians – crimes which the judge said Bemba was made aware of but did nothing to stop.

He had led the MLC (Movement for the Liberation of Congo) rebel group during DR Congo’s brutal civil war and after a 2003 peace deal he laid down his arms and joined an interim government.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) said the sentence offered “a measure of justice” for the victims.

“Other commanders should take notice that they, too, can be held accountable for rapes and other serious abuses committed by troops under their control,” said Geraldine Mattioli-Zeltner, HRW’s international justice advocacy director.

The MLC is now a major opposition party in DR Congo and Secretary General Eve Bazaiba criticised the ICC ruling and sentence.

“We will never cease denouncing the selective justice of the ICC,” she told supporters in the capital Kinshasa.

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Rogerson, McNamara trial: What happened in Unit 803?

The trial of Roger Rogerson and Glen McNamara over the murder of Jamie Gao heard three stories of how the university student died in a Sydney storage unit.

Eleven years ago, Roger “Don’t call me The Dodger” Rogerson was sitting in the dock, clutching a John Grisham thriller as he waited to find out how long he would be spending in the Big House this time around.

“Few in the community would not have heard of Roger Rogerson,” said Judge Peter Berman in 2005, noting that Rogerson had once quipped the media had changed his name by deed poll to “Disgraced Former Detective”.

Roger Rogerson leaves Sydney's King Street Supreme Court in April 2016 image www.crimefiles.net

Roger Rogerson leaves Sydney’s King Street Supreme Court in April 2016 after facing the court on murder charges. Photo: Christopher Pearce

On hearing his client had received a two-year jail term for lying to the Police Integrity Commission, his lawyer, Paul Kenny, said outside court: “Roger used to be a tough guy. These days he’s just a broken-down old man … completely broken by the system.”
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Fast forward more than a decade and the “broken-down old man” is now 75, has dodgy hips, and is heading back to his home away from home – jail. He was on Wednesday found guilty of murdering university student Jamie Gao, with fellow ex-detective Glen McNamara. This will be Rogerson’s fourth stint behind bars.

Born in January 1941, Roger Caleb Rogerson was possibly the most corrupt police officer the country has ever known, although he has claimed the only corruption he was ever involved in was driving a police car while under the influence.

Rogerson after being released from Kirkconnell Correctional facility in 2006 image www.crimefiles.net

Rogerson after being released from Kirkconnell Correctional facility in 2006. Photo: Adam Hollingworth

As a police officer, Rogerson was present on two occasions when police shot and killed people, and on another two occasions he shot and killed people himself. The most famous of these was the heroin dealer Warren Lanfranchi, whom Rogerson shot and killed in a laneway in Chippendale in June 1981.

Lanfranchi, who, according to his girlfriend, Sallie-Anne Huckstepp​, was unarmed and carrying $10,000 and was delivered to the meeting by major crime figure Neddy Smith, who is currently serving a life sentence for an unrelated murder. The money was never found.

At the inquest, Rogerson was found to have fatally shot Lanfranchi while trying to effect an arrest. Interestingly, the jury failed to find that it was in self-defence. Witnesses told the inquest that they had heard two shots which were 10 seconds apart.

Rogerson speaking to the media in 1985 image www.crimefiles.net

Rogerson speaking to the media in 1985. Photo: Russell McPhedran

Years later, when the ABC screened Blue Murder, an explosive mini-series based on Rogerson’s infamy, he was less than impressed.

Of the scriptwriter, he said: “Ian David is a boof-headed, bald-headed, big-headed c—. I should have sued the c— and those f—wits at the ABC but of course I’ve got no credit left.”

And on the famous scene in Blue Murder which revisited Rogerson shooting Lanfranchi, Rogerson said: “I mean, he made it out to be this f—ing conspiracy between the 18 coppers who were there that day, when really it was just a Saturday afternoon’s work as far as we were concerned.”

Warren Lanfranchi, who was shot dead in Sydney's Chippendale in 1981. Rogerson was charged with his killing image www.crimefiles.net

Warren Lanfranchi, who was shot dead in Sydney’s Chippendale in 1981.

Rogerson was charged with his killing.

In 1984, only three years after the Lanfranchi shooting, undercover detective Michael Drury was standing in his kitchen at his Chatswood home when he was shot. He gave what was taken to be a dying deposition that he was due to testify in a major drugs trial and that Rogerson had offered him a bribe to protect a Melbourne drug dealer. However, he survived.

In 1985, Rogerson faced trial and was acquitted of the bribery of Drury. In 1989, he was acquitted of conspiring, with Christopher Dale Flannery and the confessed drug dealer Alan Williams, to murder Drury.

As his famous barrister in the bribery case, Chester Porter, QC, was to recount some years later, it was Rogerson’s word against Drury’s. Not only did Rogerson prove to be most compelling in the witness box, but during the hearing Porter had lulled Drury into a false sense of security by getting him to extol his virtues as an undercover cop, one of which was the ability to lie.

Sallie-Anne Huckstepp found floating face down in a pond in Centennial Park.image www.crimefiles.net

Sallie-Anne Huckstepp: found floating face down in a pond in Centennial Park.

“Very foolishly,” Porter later wrote in his autobiography, “he looked around at the magistrate’s court and said words to the effect that he could tell lies in the court, and nobody could pick him.”

Porter devastated Drury with this, pointing out that, as he was such a proficient liar, how was the jury to know when to believe him.

Apart from his trial, other matters were spiralling out of control for Rogerson in 1985.

Tony Martin (playing Neddy Smith) and Richard Roxburgh (playing Roger Rogerson) in the television show Blue Murder.image www.crimefiles.net

Tony Martin (playing Neddy Smith) and Richard Roxburgh (playing Roger Rogerson) in the television show Blue Murder.

Huckstepp was found floating face down in a pond in Centennial Park. Neddy Smith was charged – and later acquitted – of her murder.

Then there was the problem of gangland murders threatening to bring everyone down. Hitman Chris Flannery, also known as Mr Rent-a-Kill, was not only a central figure in the underworld wars, he was out of control.

Flannery, who was last seen in May 1985, was believed to be the shooter at the attempted murder of Drury the previous year.

The real Neddy Smith with Roger Rogerson.image www.crimefiles.net

The real Neddy Smith with Roger Rogerson.

At an inquest into Flannery’s suspected murder, Neddy Smith maintained that the one person Flannery trusted was Rogerson and that, after Flannery disappeared, Rogerson said to him: “Chris had to go, mate. He was becoming a danger to us all.”

Coroner Greg Glass announced that he suspected that Rogerson killed Chris Flannery. And if Rogerson didn’t kill Flannery, then he knew who did, the coroner said.

Rogerson later told Channel Nine’s Sunday program: “Flannery was a complete pest. The guys up here in Sydney tried to settle him down. They tried to look after him as best they could, but he was, I believe, out of control. Maybe it was the Melbourne instinct coming out of him. He didn’t want to do as he was told, he was out of control, and having overstepped that line, well, I suppose they said he had to go but I can assure you I had nothing to do with it.”

Former police officer Michael Drury. Roger Rogerson was charged with his attempted murder but found not guilty.image www.crimefiles.net

Former police officer Michael Drury. Roger Rogerson was charged with his attempted murder but found not guilty. Photo: James Brickwood

Smith’s testimony at Flannery’s inquest revealed the bitter falling out with Rogerson. Asked by a journalist if he felt sorry that his most infamous informant was serving a life sentence as well as suffering from Parkinson’s disease, Rogerson replied: “Very sorry. I feel so sorry for Ned I hope he dies as quickly as possible.”

Why?

Rogerson: “Because he’s a c—! Ha ha ha ha! Because he’s a big strong bloke, a brilliant street-fighter in his day, a guy who, for a while there, was making $30,000 a f—ing minute and who had more cash than the Reserve f—ing Bank, and now he’s lost his marbles and that’s sad. I hate seeing blokes go to jail. I’m like Rex Hunt I catch ’em and I throw ’em back. For mine, jail doesn’t work. To me, the challenge was always catching ’em. And listen, I’ve never, ever denied having a good time doing it. I enjoyed being a cop. I met some fantastic people, worked some great cases and travelled to some wonderful places. It was good bloody fun.”

Christopher Flannery photographed in 1981 image www.crimefiles.net

Christopher Flannery photographed in 1981.

Among the good times Rogerson enjoyed was an alleged romp with singer Shirley Bassey. Rogerson claims that he was walking to his favourite hamburger shop in the city when he spied someone hotfooting it across Goulburn Street “with a nice sequined handbag tucked under his arm”.

Rogerson told Ralph magazine: “So I chased after him, tackled him to the ground and elicited a confession out of him. Turns out he’d swiped Shirley Bassey’s handbag from backstage as she rehearsed for a gig at Chequers that night … Anyway, after I whipped this bloke up to Central and charged him, I walked back to Chequers with the handbag. I knew the owner pretty well and he introduced me to Shirley … and, well, let’s just say she showed her appreciation in a very special way.”

Interviewer: “Are you saying you banged Shirley Bassey, the same Shirley Bassey who sang Goldfinger, backstage at Chequers?”

Shirley Bassey, who Rogerson claims he 'got to know very well'image www.crimefiles.net

Shirley Bassey, who Rogerson claims he ‘got to know very well’. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

Rogerson: “No, I’m not. I’m saying we got to know each other very well, and that’s all I want to say as a gentleman. The rest is private and secret … up until now.”

The “bloody good fun” Rogerson enjoyed as a rogue cop came to a crashing halt in 1986 when he was finally dismissed from the service after the Police Tribunal sustained seven of nine misconduct charges against him.

But, in a strange twist, it was the plans Rogerson made on the expectation he would be jailed for the Drury matter that ultimately brought him undone. While the jury was deliberating on his fate, Rogerson was overheard telling his then wife Joy about his secret bank accounts.

Rogerson on the speaking circuit with Mark Jacko Jackson and Warwick Capper.image www.crimefiles.net

Rogerson on the speaking circuit with Mark “Jacko” Jackson and Warwick Capper. Photo: Rick Stevens

During his next trial, there was no sign of Chester Porter. Years later this silk explained.

“He told me quite a deal and when the facts came out about his secret banking accounts, it wasn’t completely consistent with what he told me. There could have been embarrassment,” Porter said.

In 1990, Rogerson was found guilty and jailed for conspiring to pervert the course of justice with two other men, including drug smuggler Nick Paltos, for organising bank accounts totalling $110,000 in false names. The accounts had been set up during the Drury trial

Anne Melocco leaving court after her husband was sentenced to two and a half years jail in 2005 image www.crimefiles.net

Anne Melocco leaving court after her husband was sentenced to two and a half years jail in 2005. Photo: Wade Laube

He spent nine months in jail before being acquitted on appeal. But, in 1992, the appeal was quashed and Rogerson returned to Berrima jail until his release in 1995.

Rogerson turned to scaffolding on his release from jail with a sideline in regaling pub audiences with his tales of his police activities. This included auctioning signed photos of himself standing near Lanfranchi’s body as it lay in the gutter in Dangar Place, Chippendale.

But within a decade Rogerson was back in jail after being convicted of lying about bribing a Liverpool Council official to obtain work.

Former detective Roger Rogerson is one of the most notorious officers ever to have served in the NSW Police image www.crimefiles.net

Rogerson had already committed perjury at the Police Integrity Commission before being told his house had been bugged for a long time and there were tapes that showed he was lying.

“It’s an absolute invasion of privacy!” he hissed from the witness box, demanding to know if he’d been taped having sex with his second wife Anne Melocco. “I want to know how good I am,” he said crossly.

Informed by counsel assisting David Frearson that there were no sex tapes because the commission was only interested in illegal activities, Rogerson retorted: “So there is no tapes there of me having sex, because that would be legal?”

He later muttered, “The sooner I leave this state the better.”

“Perhaps for other people as well,” Frearson deadpanned.

View to a kill: the death of Jamie Gao

Surveillance camera footage creates a detailed timeline of the 2014 killing of Jamie Gao.

Jamie Gao and Glen McNamara cctv stillEarly January, 2014 Jamie Gao and Glen McNamara meet at least 27 times in the lead-up to Gao’s death, often at the Meridian Hotel in Hurstville.

Rent a Space unit 803Early March, 2014  Roger Rogerson obtains keys to storage unit 803 at Rent a Space, Padstow, from a friend named Michael McGuire. Rogerson says he wanted to look at office furniture. Gao is eventually killed inside the shed.

April 27, 2014  A white Ford Falcon station wagon with number plates BV67PX is purchased ­at Outback Used Cars in Lethbridge Park. The car is later used to transport Gao’s body. Rogerson and McNamara deny involvement in the car’s acquisition, but Rogerson’s fingerprints are found on the receipt.

McNamara removes his 4.5 metre boat cctv stillMay 19, 2014  McNamara removes his 4.5 metre Quintrex boat from Hunter Self Storage at Taren Point without notifying staff. This is later used to dump Gao’s body at sea.

Rogerson and office chairs cctv stillMay 19, 3.15pm CCTV footage from Rent a Space captures Rogerson removing office chairs from storage unit 803 and placing them in the back of his silver Ford station wagon.

A white Nissan Silvia, consistant with Gao's car cctv stillMay 19, afternoon A white Nissan Silvia, consistent with Gao’s car, does a U-turn outside Rent a Space.

Jamie Gao and Glen McNamara Meridian Hotel, Hurstville cctv stillMay 19, 7.50pm  The night before Gao is killed, McNamara and Gao meet at the Meridian Hotel, Hurstville. The meeting lasts about 30 minutes.

McNamara walks to Cronulla Mall cctv stillMay 20, 11.37am McNamara uses a payphone in Cronulla Mall to call Gao. CCTV from Cold Rock Ice Creamery captures him walking towards the phone.

McNamara opening and shutting the door cctv stillMay 20, 1.17pm Rogerson and McNamara drive in separate cars to Rent a Space. McNamara is seen opening and closing the door four times in nine minutes.

Gao walking down Arab Road cctv stillMay 20, 1.35pm Gao is seen walking down Arab Road, Padstow, dressed in dark-coloured clothes, towards a white Ford station wagon that McNamara is in.

McNamara at front gate cctv stillMay 20, 1,42pm McNamara drives to the front gate of Rent a Space and enters the gate code – his hood is up and sunglasses are on.

Gao getting out of a white Ford station wagon cctv stillMay 20, 1.46pm Gao is seen getting out of the back of a white Ford station wagon and shielded by McNamara as he slips into storage unit 803. It is the last time he is seen alive.

Rogerson opens the door cctv stillMay 20, 1.49pm Rogerson opens the door to storage unit 803 exactly three minutes and 16 seconds after Gao and McNamara entered.

McNamara comes out of unit cctv stillMay 20, 2.03pm McNamara comes out of the storage unit, retrieves a silver Ocean & Earth surfboard bag from the white Ford station wagon, and returns to the storage unit.

McNamara and Rogerson are both seen dragging surfboard cover cctv stillMay 20, 2.18pm McNamara and Rogerson are seen dragging a surfboard cover containing Gao’s body, and load it into the boot of the white Ford station wagon.

Rogerson and McNamara are seen buying a two tonne chain block cctv stillMay 20, about 4pm Rogerson and McNamara are seen at Kennards Hire in Taren Point, buying a two-tonne chain block that was later used to lift Gao’s body into McNamara’s boat.

Rogerson and McNamara share a six pack of James Boag's cctv stillMay 20, about 5.15pm A few hours after the killing, Rogerson and McNamara share a six-pack of beer at McNamara’s unit in McDonald St, Cronulla. (McNamara claims he only helped to dispose of Gao’s body because his life was threatened by Rogerson.) 

Quintrex Boat being towed cctv stillMay 21, 7.28am A Quintrex boat carrying the body of Gao and a blue tarpaulin leaves McNamara’s Cronulla unit block.

McNamara and Rogerson are seen in the lift cctv stillMay 21, 7.32am McNamara and Rogerson are seen carrying fishing rods in the lift of McNamara’s unit block.

Quintrex boat being towed cctv stillMay 21, 11.05am After disposing of Gao’s body, McNamara brings his Quintrex boat back to Hunter Self Storage at Taren Point.

McNamara at Kmart cctv stillMay 22 McNamara says he was so worried when he found 3kg of ice in his car that he went to Kmart and bought two pillowslips, a measuring jug and a spoon. He claims this was to “seal” the drugs to stop them from exploding.

detectives arrest McNamaraMay 25, 6.30pm Robbery and Serious Crime Squad detectives arrest McNamara at a vehicle stop at Kyeemagh. He is refused bail and appears at Kogarah Local Court the following day.

Jamie Gao afloat inside a surfboard bag 2.5 kilomtres off the shoreMay 26 Fishermen spot the body of Jamie Gao inside a surfboard bag wrapped in blue tarpaulin about 2.5 kilometres offshore of Shelley Beach, Cronulla.

Rogerson arrested at Padstow Heights homeMay 27, 11am Police swoop on Rogerson’s Padstow Heights home. He is escorted out in handcuffs and taken to Bankstown police station, where he is refused bail.

www.policesearch.net

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Cowboy lassos bike thief outside of a Walmart in Oregon. image www.crimefiles.net

POLICE say a rancher jumped on his horse and lassoed a man who was trying to steal a bicycle in the parking lot of a Walmart in Oregon, USA.

The Medford Mail Tribune reports 28-year-old Robert Borba was at the store getting dog food Friday when he heard a woman screaming that someone was trying to steal her bike.

The rancher says he quickly got his horse out of its trailer, grabbed a rope, rode over and lassoed the man and bicycle.

“I seen this fella trying to get up to speed on a bicycle,” said Borba, who was planning on helping brand cattle in California that afternoon. “I wasn’t going to catch him on foot. I just don’t run very fast.”

Eagle Point police Sgt. Darin May says officers arrived and found a lassoed man and bike on the ground in the parking lot.

eagle point Police usa arrive to arrest the thief. image www.crimefiles.net

Police arrive to arrest the thief. Picture: Eagle Point Police Department/Facebook

“We’ve never had anyone lassoed and held until we got there,” May told the Mail Tribune. “That’s a first for me.”

It was a first for Borba too, as he had only ever used his lasso skills to rope in cattle before. “I use a rope every day, that’s how I make my living,” he said. “If it catches cattle pretty good, it catches a bandit pretty good.”

Police arrested Victorino Arellano-Sanchez, whom they described as a transient from the Seattle area, on a theft charge.

Arellano-Sanchez is jailed in Jackson County. Staff members at the jail say they don’t think he has an lawyer.

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Orlando shooting: Ex-wife of gunman Omar Mateen says he was violent and abusive

Omar Mateen's ex-wife has spoken publicly image www.crimefiles.net

Omar Mateen’s ex-wife has spoken publicly. Photo: Myspace

The ex-wife of the 29-year-old man suspected of killing 50 people in a Orlando nightclub on Sunday said that he was violent and mentally unstable and beat her repeatedly while they were married.

The ex-wife said she met Omar Mateen online about eight years ago and decided to move to Florida and marry him.

Orlando shooter Omar Mateen image www.crimefiles.net

At first, the marriage was normal, she said, but then he became abusive.

“He was not a stable person,” said the ex-wife, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because she feared for her safety in the wake of the mass shooting.

“He beat me. He would just come home and start beating me up because the laundry wasn’t finished or something like that.”

Ray Rivera, a DJ at Pulse Orlando nightclub, is consoled by a friend, after the shooting.image www.crimefiles.net

Ray Rivera, a DJ at Pulse Orlando nightclub, is consoled by a friend, after the shooting. Photo: Joe Burbank via AP

While the FBI has not identified Mateen publicly, US law enforcement officials said his identification was found on the body of the killer, who was armed with a handgun and an assault rifle.

Authorities think he used those weapons to kill 50 people and injure dozens more in the attack on the gay nightclub that began just after 2am on Sunday morning. Mateen was killed in a shootout with police three hours later after a SWAT team assaulted a section of the club where Mateen was holed up with hostages.

Mateen’s ex-wife said his family was from Afghanistan, but her ex-husband was born in New York. His family later moved to Florida.

In a series of Myspace photos, Mateen is seen taking selfies and wearing New York Police Department shirts in a couple of the shots. His ex-wife identified him as the man in the Myspace photos.

Mateen’s ex-wife said she was having a difficult time when she first met him and decided to move to Florida to be with him. The two married in March 2009 and moved into a 2-bedroom condominium in Fort Pierce, Florida, that Mateen’s family owned.

“He seemed like a normal human being,” she said, adding that he wasn’t very religious and worked out at the gym often.

She said in the few months they were married he gave no signs of having fallen under the sway of radical Islam. She said he owned a small-caliber handgun and worked as a guard at a nearby facility for juvenile delinquents.

“He was a very private person,” she said.

The ex-wife said her parents intervened when they learned Mateen had assaulted her. Her father confirmed the account and said that the marriage lasted only a few months.

Her parents flew down to Fort Pierce and pulled her out of the house, leaving all her belongings behind. The ex-wife said she never had contact with Mateen again despite attempts by him to reach her.

“They literally saved my life,” she said of her parents.

According to Florida court records, the two formally divorced in 2011.

After learning about what happened in Orlando, she said: “I am still processing. I am definitely lucky.”

The Washington Post

Published on Jun 12, 2016

The violence reportedly erupted before 2 a.m. June is Gay Pride Month.

Police have confirmed that they responded to a shooting at the nightclub, and numerous emergency vehicles were responding. Officers on the scene were armed with assault rifles.

However, no details of the incident have been confirmed, and information remains sketchy.

An Orlando newspaper reporter apparently has indicated that the gunman also may have been armed with a bomb.

One person who said online that he had been at the club when the shooting began reported that he managed to escape because he was close to an exit. Other people who were dancing or at the bar tried to take cover by dropping to the floor.

Video of emergency crews helping victims was beginning to be posted on social media.

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Indonesia has decided to investigate one of the darkest chapters of its own history. In 1965 at least 500,000 people died in organised killings of suspected communist sympathisers. But, as BBC Indonesian’s Rebecca Henschke reports, the new investigation into that bloody time is re-opening old wounds.

A mass grave in the middle of a forest

There is a spot in the middle of a teak forest, the ground covered with leaves, on the outskirts of Pati in Central Java. Radim, a thin farmer in his 70s, describes what happened here one night in 1965.

Local intelligence officials appeared as the BBC visited the site of an alleged mass grave image www.crimefiles.net Local intelligence officials were clearly nervous of media at the site of the purported mass grave image www.crimefiles.net

“They came on carts pulled by cows…their hands were tied together with rope. They were forced to kneel, then shot in the back by soldiers and kicked into mass graves.”

The violence was unleashed after communists were accused of killing six generals in an attempted coup. It was the peak of the Cold War and a power battle between communists, the military and Islamic groups was in full swing.

The army and local militia went on an anti-Communist rampage, killing, it is estimated, at least half-a-million and up to three million people within a year.

Radim says he was too frightened to speak out until now image crimefiles.net

For almost 50 years speaking about that time has been taboo and official history books gloss over the killings.

Where previous governments refused to apologise or even accept that it happened, President Joko Widodo’s investigation has seen senior ministers meet with survivors. There is even talk of digging up mass graves such as this.

“I am not afraid anymore, I am proud to tell you the truth. I never thought there would be a time like this. Before I only knew fear,” Radim says.

But this clearly doesn’t come without risks.

How the investigation makes many nervous

As Radim reveals the location of the grave, 15 men in plain clothes – local intelligence officials – surround us and the atmosphere is tense. The investigation has angered and unsettled many in the military elite and Muslim organisations accused of taking part in the killings.

Local intelligence officials appeared as the BBC visited the site of an alleged mass grave image www.crimefiles.net

In central Java where most of the killings took place anti-communist banners have been erected. Vigilante groups have shut down discussions about Marxism at universities. Soldiers even briefly detained some students for wearing red T-shirts with a picture of a hammer and sickle inside a coffee cup.

It’s also creating divisions in the government.

Defence Minister Ryamizard Ryacudu has met with Islamic vigilante groups and resists these moves to dig up the past.

“I am responsible for security in this country. I need to make sure there are no more conflicts. …if we keep looking back we are not going to go forward,” he told the BBC.

He is worried that those responsible for the massacre could be indicted for crimes against humanity.

Those with a stake in keeping the status quo fear the consequences of reviving the divisions of that time. But even if it does re-open old divisions, many welcome the chance to embrace the truth.

Those happy to admit they killed

It is easy to find someone who will proudly tell you how many they killed in 1965 and how they did it.

Burhanaddin is among those who killed at the time indonesia image www.crimefiles.net

Burhanaddin ZR says he killed more people than he could count and shows no remorse.

“There is no need for reconciliation.”

“The only path is they need to let go of their angry feelings,” he says of those that lost relatives. “They just want revenge because their family members were victims in our raids.”

In the Oscar-nominated documentary The Act of Killing a group of men acted out the murders in horrific detail. In many areas killers live close to the families of the dead. Land and property that was illegally confiscated has never been returned.

Until recently they have always thought of themselves as heroes because they were supported by the government and mainstream media. Many of the executions were directly committed by the security forces. The largest Muslim organisations are also accused of taking part.

President Widodo’s move has made them all nervous.

The stigmatised still feel pain

Thousands were tortured and imprisoned for years without trial. When they were released their identity cards marked them as former political prisoners. It was not until 2004 that the label was officially removed from the ID’s.

For decades they and their families were banned from holding government jobs, entering the military or the police. Their children were stopped from going to school and university. Families were torn apart as children stayed away from their parents in an attempt to live without stigma.

Only in 2005 did this change.

The events of 1965 have remained taboo in Indonesia for almost 50 years image www.crimefiles.net

The survivors to afraid to speak out

In the 1960s the Indonesian Communist Party was the second largest in the world. Its members were mostly intellectuals, farmers, artists and social activists. To escape the purge some went into exile in the Netherlands and Russia.

For decades they weren’t allowed to come home, even to bury their loved ones. Even now when high-profile exiles return they are monitored by intelligence agents.

The youth who don’t know their own history

Under General Suharto, who effectively took power shortly after the attempted coup and remained until 1998, school children were forced to watch a graphically violent three-hour-long government film about the brutal alleged coup by the communists.

Accused of being communists or communist sympathisers, hundreds of thousands, possibly millions were murdered image www.crimefiles.net

Children were indoctrinated to believe that communists were evil. The favourite uncle of Eric Sasona, a film critic and political scientist, was one of the killers. He used to boast about murdering suspected communists with a hatchet. It wasn’t until recently that he heard a different story.

“When I watched the documentary The Act of Killing – where the killers performed what they did so proudly – I thought of my uncle. I felt sick in the stomach and I had to turn it off after a few minutes,” Mr Sasona said.

He believes his uncle was simply a product of the time, but he does think Indonesia needs to talk about what happened.

“We have to end the culture of impunity that still exists; we have to end this because people can get away with their crimes. Coming to terms with our past is the key to solving today’s problems like corruption.”

Given the deep divisions, hopes of justice or national reconciliation are slim. But the government has made the decision to open up a Pandora’s Box, something many thought would never happen in their lifetime. But where it will lead is not clear.

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Ashraf Kamal Makary.serial-rapist image www.crimefiles.net

A serial predator who hunted and raped young Korean women travelling and working in Australia has been sentenced to 18 years and six months in jail.

Ashraf Kamal Makary, 42, was on Friday sentenced in the Brisbane District Court after a jury found him guilty of two rapes, one attempted rape and three counts of administering a stupefying drug on Wednesday.

Justice Leanne Clare was scathing in her assessment of the Egypt-born offender, describing him as a “true serial predator” from whom the community needed protection.

Justice Clare said Makary deliberately hunted the young Korean women through a language exchange website, with the intention of raping them.

“You devised a wicked plan, you set a trap and you lured the prey,” she said.

The court heard Makary emailed and texted the women – who were aged 19, 20 and 24 – in the weeks leading up to April 2011, to encourage them to meet with him.

Justice Clare said he brought his own “rape kit” to the meetings, which included wine and sleeping tablets, with the intention of turning each woman into a “rag doll”.

Defence barrister Joshua Fenton had argued his client’s offending was less serious because there was no gratuitous violence involved.

However Justice Clare said Makary’s drugging of victims was the “most serious aspect” of his offending.

“The women were are your mercy,” she said.

“They were here in Australia for opportunity and adventure.

“Instead you stole the freedom and innocence of their youth.”

The court heard Makary had no prior criminal history, however he has since been convicted of another rape that occurred while he was on bail in April 2012.

He will be sentenced for that matter next week.

Justice Clare said although he had spent four years in pre-sentence custody, she would still impose a sentence of 18 years and six months.

“You took the opportunity while on bail to rape yet another woman,” she said.

“You only stopped because you were locked up.”

www.goodgirlsgo.com

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ISIS preparing to execute men allegedly caught spying for the US in Salah al-Din, Iraq image www.crimefiles.net

ISIS preparing to execute men allegedly caught spying for the US in Salah al-Din, Iraq

Paranoia within ISIL’s ranks has resulted in up to 30 members executed on suspicion of being spies.

The number of ISIL officials murdered by their own organisation have increased in recent months as the group begins to turn on itself in fear of infiltration by Syrian opposition, Kurdish militia and Iraqi military personnel.

The extremist group has found new and more tortuous methods of executing “spies” in the hopes of curbing the situation.

ISIL executioners have started to use a gruesome execution method where supposed traitors are drowned in vats of acid, AP reports.

An Iraqi intelligence officer reported up to 10 ISIL fighters had been executed in the city of Mosul in April on suspicion of being spies.

The extremist group has responded to the dissemination of secret information by planting suspected informants with false data and waiting to see how US and opposition forces respond.

Fight for Fallujah: Iraqi forces enter major ISIS stronghold

The Iraqi government says it has begun an assault on Fallujah, the first Iraqi city to fall to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), back in January 2014.
Few expect it to be an easy fight.

Government forces had been surrounding the city for months. And ISIL has had time to dig in and bolster its defences.

Fallujah’s recapture would build on a series of recent victories against ISIL.

And leave Mosul as the armed group’s only remaining foothold inside Iraq.

But will the army succeed? And what would a victory mean for embattled Prime Minister Haider al Abadi?

ISIL fighters are regularly stopped on the streets to have their phones inspected for suspicious numbers or quizzed on specific religious rituals. “Daesh (ISIL) is now concentrating on how to find informers because they have lost commanders that are hard to replace,” said a senior Iraqi intelligence official in Baghdad, AP reports.

The loss of key supply routes into Turkey have reportedly hurt the group financially and forced many fighters to start feeding information to coalition forces in order to balance declining salaries.

Instability in ISIL ranks has become so devastating the group has even turned its suspicions to civilians with suspected spies killed and hung in public places signs placed on their chests proclaiming their crime.

www.spy-drones.com

Battle of Fallujah: Drone video of the battlefield during the pounding of ISIS positions

The battle for the liberation of Fallujah (May 23, 2016): Drone video of the battlefield during the pounding of ISIS positions by Iraqi artillery and rockets. The footage was released by a channel close to the Iraqi Kata’ib Hezbollah (Hezbollah Brigades) || Die Schlacht um Falludscha: Drohnenaufnahmen des Schlachtfeldes während der Bekämpfung von IS Verteidigungsstellungen im Umfeld der Stadt.

The murders come as opposition forces push into the stronghold of Fallujah.

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This primate was not monkeying around when he stole the cash from the jewellery store drawer

Trained Monkey Robs Rs 10000 from Jewellery Shop in India (Guntur), Monkey Thieves Caught on Camera

A thieving monkey has been filmed ransacking a jewellery shop and running off with cash in India.

The primate is said to have deliberately distracted staff by throwing a piece of fruit into the shop before “advancing towards the cash drawers”, The Hindu Times reports.

“The monkey threw a guava inside the shop. Then it entered the store in the pretext of taking back the fruit. We threw the fruit back but it entered the shop anyway,” the unnamed shop owner said.

“It sat for almost 20 minutes in the store and then it opened the drawer and took away cash.”

More than $200 is believed to have been stolen from the store, which is located in the city of Guntur, on India’s east coast.

It is not known if the cash has been recovered.

MONKEY-THIEF-STEALS-MONEY-FROM-JEWELLRY-STORE-IN-INDIA image www.crimefiles.net

Monkeys, which are revered by Hindus, often run riot in urban centres in India, to the point where a “monkey prison” has been established for the more criminally minded primates.

One such jail, in the northern city of Patiala, houses 11 monkeys apprehended for thieving and attacking people.

“It’s unlikely that any of them will ever be paroled,” warden Ram Tirath told The Daily Telegraph.

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Published on Jun 2, 2016

Serial killer Michael Madison’s death sentence an antidote for victims’ families
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At least 50 homicide-related charges have been brought against West Australian children in the past six years with five boys currently being held in detention facing murder charges over three unrelated deaths in 2016.

If any of the boys, aged between 12 and 17 years old, are convicted, they will become the first child sentenced for murder in WA in nine years following the convictions of two 17-year-old girls who strangled their friend to death in Collie in 2006

murdered-in-wa-aust-Kuol Akut (top left), Patrick Slater, (middle) and Alan Taylor (bottom left) were all allegedly killed by children. image www.crimefiles.net

Kuol Akut (top left), Patrick Slater, (middle) and Alan Taylor (bottom left) were all allegedly killed by children.

Three of the children in detention, aged 12, 14 and 17, are alleged to have been part of a group of eight males who fatally bashed Patrick Slater outside the Esplanade Train Station in the early hours of January 27.

A 17-year-old boy is accused of killing fellow-teenager Kuol Akut by throwing a brick at his head during an after-party street brawl in Girrawheen in April.

While the fifth boy, 17, is one of four charged with the “brutal” murder of Girrawheen father Alan Taylor in his home in April.

All are yet to enter pleas.

Police Minister Liza Harvey labelled violent attacks on any person concerning, especially when young people were involved.

“We have seen many lives shattered when young people leave home to have a good time and never return because of a violent incident,” she said.

“Police work closely with many community organisations to engage with youth.

“Youth violence is a complex social issue and we need a whole community response to help reduce the incidence.”

Since July 2010 statistics reveal more than 50 homicide-related child charge, which encompasses murder, attempted murder, manslaughter and driving occasioning death.

Relationship Australia executive director for youth programs Michael Sheehan said the increasing availability of alcohol to youths, coupled with changes to the family structure, were fuelling youth violence.

“Changing family structures, parents working longer hours – it means teenagers are bored and there’s less supervision meaning they’re more likely to get into trouble and mix with the wrong people,” he said.

His comments follow four boys being convicted of manslaughter in 2014-15 [financial year], including a 15-year-old Bunbury child who killed his newborn son during a hospital visit, and three teenagers who fatally bashed another boy, Quinn De Campe, in December 2013 after luring him into bushland to sell him cannabis.

More recently, a 12-year-old boy, in December, was convicted of unlawful wounding after he confessed to drinking alcohol with friends in Perth’s CBD and smashing a glass bottle over a man’s head who had just been “clotheslined” off his motorcycle by rope strung across the road.

He received a juvenile conditional release order after spending three months in custody awaiting his sentencing.

But it’s not just high profile cases coming through Perth Children’s Court.

In December last year, 120 children were being held in Banksia Hill Detention Centre, 25 convicted of offences against another person, 22 for robbery and extortion and 39 for break-ins and theft.

A further 975 sentenced youths were being managed within the community at the same time.

Around 10 per cent of the 15,340 charges against children in the 2014-15 financial year were violence-related.

Mr Sheehan, however, criticised WA’s criminal justice system, saying it was too heavily weighted to reactive responses to youth crime, rather than prevention and early intervention.

“They might be referred to a drug and alcohol counsellor on a community based order and that’s obviously helpful but if they’re still in an environment where their parents drink or they’ve still got access to alcohol or peer pressure, it’s still not the solution,” he said.

Peel youth services family support counsellor Tanya Langford agreed, claiming many parents struggled to deal with violent children and that government support for them was limited.

“The problem is that if the police go to the home and there’s youth violence and they don’t report it and they don’t tell the parents to report it – it doesn’t even get to the courts and that’s what’s happening,” Ms Langford said.

“This mum I’ve just been talking to, she called the police [on her violent son] and they’ve told her she needs to leave the home, she needs to go and give the kid some time to cool off.

“Or another option police sometimes use – they can do a removal order for the young person only if there is an alternative accommodation option available for up to 72 hours, but there’s often no one who will take them.”

Ms Langford said if more resources were not pumped into addressing the reasons children acted violently, the pattern would continue down to the next generation.

“We have to realise for these young kids, if they are using violence to get what they want, they are developing that passive behaviour so then there’s a really high likelihood that when they move into relationships with partners, they are going to be our future generation of domestic violence perpetrators,” she said.

“Kids are exposed to so much more aggression and violence now in games and on TV… and tied in with that we’ve got so many more single parent families, so mums are trying to raise boys that don’t have good male role models in their lives.”

Ms Langford believed a solution to the problem would be to initiate court-ordered intervention programs that violent children must attend, before it gets to the point where they are charged with an offence and go through the court system.

She said the limited invention programs currently available for families often struggled to maintain child participation, as they were not compulsory.

Department of Child Protection director general Emma White said although the department did not keep statistics on violent children, it worked with families and young people to provide early intervention strategies and prevent risks from escalating.

“Responding to youth criminal and anti-social behaviour requires a multi-agency approach, and strong partnerships are in place between the Department, the Department of Education, Department of Health, Department of Corrective Services and the Western Australian Police to target services toward youth who are considered most at risk,” she said.

“The department funds a range of services to assist families where youth criminal and anti-social behaviour may present including family counselling, parent-teen conflict and specialist family and domestic violence services.”

If you are experiencing family and domestic violence or concerned about becoming violent or abusive contact the state-wide 24 hour helplines.

  • Women’s Domestic Violence Helpline – free call 1800 007 339
  • Men’s Domestic Violence Helpline – free call 1800 000 599

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